Apple Store Exclusive – The Vestax Spin DJ Controller

Vestax has teamed up with software maker Algoriddim to produce Spin, a $249.95 entry-level all-in-one digital DJ controller that will be sold elusively in Apple stores throughout the US and Canada.

Features:

  • Blend your voice into the mix through the integrated microphone input (microphone included)
  • Seamless iTunes integration through djay software, allowing easy to mix, beat match, loops to effects for creating your perfect mix tape
  • Simple plug-and-play setup
  • Touch sensor jog wheel platters give high resolution to experience an analog feel when scratching and mixing
  • Multi-channel audio system for high quality monitoring, master output and separate microphone input
  • A compact and light DJ All-in-one system
  • Seamless iTunes integration
  • Easy-to-use drag and drop interface
  • Automix and automatic tempo
  • Beat detection, beat-matched looping and BPM-sync
  • Auto-gain
  • Sampler and visual cue points
  • Live Microphone with pitch and echo effect
  • Audio effects such as speed change, reverse, time-stretching, pitch-shifting and more
  • Record mixes for podcasts, photo slide shows and mix tapes
  • Export history of played songs as iTunes playlist or PDF
  • Cover artwork on virtual vinyl
  • Support for all major audio formats such as MP3, AAC, WAV, AIFF, Audio-CD and songs purchased from the iTunes Music Store

Technical specifications

  • DJ USB Midi controller
  • Touch sensor platters
  • Headphone output
  • Microphone input
  • Dimensions (WxHxD): 14.0 x 9.5 x 1.5 in./35.6 x 24.1 x 3.8 cm
  • Weight: 3.2 lbs./1.5 kg (Spin only)

System requirements

  • Mac OS X v10.4 or later
  • 1.8GHz or faster Intel processor
  • 1GB of RAM

What’s in the box?

  • Spin (DJ midi controller)
  • Microphone with adapter
  • USB cable
  • djay 3 software with license key
  • User manual (Set-up basic guide)
  • 1/8- to 1/4-in. adapter for headphone or microphone

Official blurbage below.

Did you notice?

Spin—with its seamlessly integrated djay software—allows you to record your mixes as a high-quality audio file, for use in your latest podcast, movie, photo slide show or to make a classic “mix tape”.

Apple Recommends for…

Beginners and seasoned pros alike who want to mix tracks and playlists from iTunes on their Mac. Or iTunes users and music lovers who want to have fun with their music and explore the world of DJing.

Be your own DJ with iTunes

Spin and djay software let you easily mix all your favorite songs from iTunes. Simply drag and drop, and get creative with your own music.

Touch sensor jog wheels

High-resolution touch-sensitive jog wheels allow you to DJ like in analog mode from scratching to remixing.

Multi-channel audio system

Spin comes with high-quality sound for monitoring, master output and a separate mic input.

Compact and light

A travel friendly unit perfect for the Mac, it comes with a USB cable and djay software so you can DJ anywhere you want.

Perfectly match your music

djay’s on-the-fly beat and tempo detection allows you to easily match two songs for a perfect transition.

Find the right song

Preview and prepare the next song with headphones through Spin before playing it through the main speakers.

Automix your party

One click means hours of fun. Sit back and let Spin/djay mix your favorite iTunes playlists with seamless DJ-style transitions.

Scratch. Mix. Loop.

Discover the world of DJing. Use the featured buttons, jog wheel platters and faders to mix and scratch your songs. Every feature found on the Spin interface will allow you endless opportunities of creative DJing from loops to effects.

Record your mixes

Save your mix—for your latest podcast, movie or photo slide show, or to make a classic “mix tape.” Just push the REC button.

8 thoughts on “Apple Store Exclusive – The Vestax Spin DJ Controller

  1. Just bought this. Very cool little device. It has all of the expected doodads from professional DJ setups – touch sensitive turntables, pitch control, looping, some canned effects (basically echo), EQ controls, one cue point per song. There's more I just started using it.

    The software is excellent – reads directly from iTunes and allows you to drag and drop songs directly onto your decks (like Serato or Trakktor). You can even use your mouse to move the virtual tone arm around the record. The cue and looping features are intuitive. Cool little lights, too!

    Definitely some downsides:

    The master output consists only of one red and one white RCA output. You have to have your speakers connected to Spin (and not to your laptop), if you want to separate your "master" output – what the crowd hears – and have the ability to listen to one or both channels "privately" in your headphones. Spin itself is the mixer – you can't cue songs without hearing them live at the same time if you just use speakers connected to the laptop.

    With only one white / one red for the master output, you need to either use just one speaker that accepts RCA, or buy a pair of speakers with the RCA input on one of them with the built-in cord linking to the other (the Bose Companion 2 desktop computer speakers are set up like that, but don't have enough bass for my taste). Perhaps you can also run one channel (the red) to one speaker and the other channel (the white) to another, but this doesn't seem to make a lot of sense.

    I bought the Bose Companion 3 for more muscle, but the RCA inputs on the subwoofer are only for the small "satellite" speakers, and therefore there is no open RCA input for the Spin! The Companion 3s accept only a headphone jack (1/8") input, so now I need an RCA female to 1/8" male adapter. I'm sure there are other solutions but it can be very frustrating for the beginner trying to make it act like a regular DJ setup. Why didn't they just have an alternative 1/8" output so you can plug in any computer speakers?!

    The plastic on the Spin is pretty flimsy, too, so I'll be interested to see if it lasts more than a few months without breaking. There's way too much latency for scratching, though with a brand new, top of the line laptop (mine is not), it might be better – you won't get anywhere near vinyl is my guess.

    Overall I like it a lot (it's like a mini-DJ setup for Barbie). Good for one-room parties and practicing. We'll see if it holds up.

  2. Just bought this. Very cool little device. It has all of the expected doodads from professional DJ setups – touch sensitive turntables, pitch control, looping, some canned effects (basically echo), EQ controls, one cue point per song. There's more I just started using it.

    The software is excellent – reads directly from iTunes and allows you to drag and drop songs directly onto your decks (like Serato or Trakktor). You can even use your mouse to move the virtual tone arm around the record. The cue and looping features are intuitive. Cool little lights, too!

    Definitely some downsides:

    The master output consists only of one red and one white RCA output. You have to have your speakers connected to Spin (and not to your laptop), if you want to separate your "master" output – what the crowd hears – and have the ability to listen to one or both channels "privately" in your headphones. Spin itself is the mixer – you can't cue songs without hearing them live at the same time if you just use speakers connected to the laptop.

    With only one white / one red for the master output, you need to either use just one speaker that accepts RCA, or buy a pair of speakers with the RCA input on one of them with the built-in cord linking to the other (the Bose Companion 2 desktop computer speakers are set up like that, but don't have enough bass for my taste). Perhaps you can also run one channel (the red) to one speaker and the other channel (the white) to another, but this doesn't seem to make a lot of sense.

    I bought the Bose Companion 3 for more muscle, but the RCA inputs on the subwoofer are only for the small "satellite" speakers, and therefore there is no open RCA input for the Spin! The Companion 3s accept only a headphone jack (1/8") input, so now I need an RCA female to 1/8" male adapter. I'm sure there are other solutions but it can be very frustrating for the beginner trying to make it act like a regular DJ setup. Why didn't they just have an alternative 1/8" output so you can plug in any computer speakers?!

    The plastic on the Spin is pretty flimsy, too, so I'll be interested to see if it lasts more than a few months without breaking. There's way too much latency for scratching, though with a brand new, top of the line laptop (mine is not), it might be better – you won't get anywhere near vinyl is my guess.

    Overall I like it a lot (it's like a mini-DJ setup for Barbie). Good for one-room parties and practicing. We'll see if it holds up.

  3. You can also just connect your headphones to the headphones jack on the front of the Spin, and use your Mac’s output for the speakers. You can select the setup in djay when connecting the Spin. Very nice actually!

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