Free EP – Colonial Spa By Carl Sagan’s Ghost

free-music-carl-sagans-ghostCarl Sagan’s Ghost, aka Daniel Davis, has released a new EP – Colonial Spa:

Take a relaxing trip with me, your host, Carl Sagan’s Ghost, as we travel to The Colonial Spa – a low-orbiting satellite spacestation where beings from around the galaxy gather to relax, trade, and converse.

This is the first EP in a series dedicated to creating a fictional space through music – or, perhaps, writing the music one might hear in such a fictional space.  It is a bit of a departure from my previous albums; it’s a little more beat orientated, some might even say it’s of the minimal-electronica sub-genre.

Colonial Spa is a free EP and comes highly recommended.

You can preview it below. Download the full EP here.

28 thoughts on “Free EP – Colonial Spa By Carl Sagan’s Ghost

  1. Good point. It's the old 'easy come, easy go' thing: one tends to value or appreciate things to the extent that one has invested in them, be it in terms of time, effort, money, learning, overcoming obstacles or whatever. Why else do rare records etc. go for inflated prices? Because they're difficult to get hold of and so to do so is an achievement. I suppose the counter argument is that this only holds if people know that there's something to hunt down in the first place. Personally, I think this marketing-led culture we're living is a great deal worse than it might otherwise be. Says I, typing a message on the internet which is pretty much free to use due to… advertising ;-p

  2. Just what the world needs – another free ep of electronic music. People giving away electronic music just says that they have no pride in their work and are willing to devalue music for the rest of us. And if this musician feels that it has no value, then why should anyone listen to it?

    Or should electronic music should always be free?

  3. Good point. It's the old 'easy come, easy go' thing: one tends to value or appreciate things to the extent that one has invested in them, be it in terms of time, effort, money, learning, overcoming obstacles or whatever. Why else do rare records etc. go for inflated prices? Because they're difficult to get hold of and so to do so is an achievement. I suppose the counter argument is that this only holds if people know that there's something to hunt down in the first place. Personally, I think this marketing-led culture we're living is a great deal worse than it might otherwise be. Says I, typing a message on the internet which is pretty much free to use due to… advertising ;-p

  4. Good point. It's the old 'easy come, easy go' thing: one tends to value or appreciate things to the extent that one has invested in them, be it in terms of time, effort, money, learning, overcoming obstacles or whatever. Why else do rare records etc. go for inflated prices? Because they're difficult to get hold of and so to do so is an achievement. I suppose the counter argument is that this only holds if people know that there's something to hunt down in the first place. Personally, I think this marketing-led culture we're living is a great deal worse than it might otherwise be. Says I, typing a message on the internet which is pretty much free to use due to… advertising ;-p

  5. The counter-argument is that your attention is the commodity now, not the music.

    Listeners have devalued new music by file-sharing music in mass numbers, and by focusing their attention on artists that were established 10-20-30 years ago, instead of searching out and supporting new ones.

    The Internet does change the dynamics of the music industry, especially for niches like ambient music.

  6. As I, and many others have said, including Brian Eno, the era of the professional musician is probably coming to an end. I don't make music for money – I make it because I want people to listen to it. Money has never been part of the musical equation for me. I just don't equate making music with making money. Maybe that's because for the last 20 years I've never made much money with it. 🙂

    "I think records were just a little bubble through time and those who made a living from them for a while were lucky. There is no reason why anyone should have made so much money from selling records except that everything was right for this period of time. I always knew it would run out sooner or later. It couldn't last, and now it's running out. I don't particularly care that it is and like the way things are going. The record age was just a blip."

    Brian Eno
    http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2010/jan/17/brian

    Also, remember what HP Lovecraft
    “What a man does for pay is of little significance. What he is, as a sensitive instrument responsive to the world’s beauty, is everything.”

    Free – it's the new expensive!

  7. As I, and many others have said, including Brian Eno, the era of the professional musician is probably coming to an end. I don't make music for money – I make it because I want people to listen to it. Money has never been part of the musical equation for me. I just don't equate making music with making money. Maybe that's because for the last 20 years I've never made much money with it. 🙂

    "I think records were just a little bubble through time and those who made a living from them for a while were lucky. There is no reason why anyone should have made so much money from selling records except that everything was right for this period of time. I always knew it would run out sooner or later. It couldn't last, and now it's running out. I don't particularly care that it is and like the way things are going. The record age was just a blip."

    Brian Eno
    http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2010/jan/17/brian

    Also, remember what HP Lovecraft
    “What a man does for pay is of little significance. What he is, as a sensitive instrument responsive to the world’s beauty, is everything.”

    Free – it's the new expensive!

  8. I really enjoyed the free delivered stuff from Carl Sagan's ghost, hear them on my iPhone and at home, and I really like more this kind of independet music rather than the other one that hast to fulfill contracts and be modeled to the taste of the producer / company. Of course he could require money for the download and if the music is good, it doesn't matter if it's free or 10$ a track… This doesn't make the music better.

  9. I really enjoyed the free delivered stuff from Carl Sagan's ghost, hear them on my iPhone and at home, and I really like more this kind of independet music rather than the other one that hast to fulfill contracts and be modeled to the taste of the producer / company. Of course he could require money for the download and if the music is good, it doesn't matter if it's free or 10$ a track… This doesn't make the music better.

  10. Plus, I take donations on my site. So if someone really wants to pay me they can. 🙂

    But what I value most of all is simply people listening to and enjoying the music I make. 1 email, or comment from someone who took the time to download and listen makes the time and effort I spent all worth while.

  11. That's the problem with the recording industry. For decades it's been telling people – listeners and creators – that music has a concrete value. Right now, iTunes is telling us that an album is worth $10. Years ago Tower Records told us that that same album was worth $14.99-$19.99 on CD. At the same time, the industry is telling us that the music made by The Beatles is worth the same amount of money as the music being made by some no-talent teen hack.

    This is highly insulting to me. The music that I love to listen to is priceless. I could never pay bands like U2, or The Cure, or Daniel Lanois, or Brian Eno enough money for the art they've given me. What's sad is that even though I've purchased almost every album from all of those artists (and many more), those artists saw very little of that money because most of it was taken by the industry.

    At the same time, the music I make is priceless – at least to me. I don't want some other party dictating how much money my music should be sold for. That's incredibly insulting.

    The value of art does not come from how much money one spends on it. This is a fallacy perpetuated by an industry and society that values commerce more than art. The value of art comes from how much the listener/viewer/participant enjoys the art, and from how the art impacts them.

  12. That's the problem with the recording industry. For decades it's been telling people – listeners and creators – that music has a concrete value. Right now, iTunes is telling us that an album is worth $10. Years ago Tower Records told us that that same album was worth $14.99-$19.99 on CD. At the same time, the industry is telling us that the music made by The Beatles is worth the same amount of money as the music being made by some no-talent teen hack.

    This is highly insulting to me. The music that I love to listen to is priceless. I could never pay bands like U2, or The Cure, or Daniel Lanois, or Brian Eno enough money for the art they've given me. What's sad is that even though I've purchased almost every album from all of those artists (and many more), those artists saw very little of that money because most of it was taken by the industry.

    At the same time, the music I make is priceless – at least to me. I don't want some other party dictating how much money my music should be sold for. That's incredibly insulting.

    The value of art does not come from how much money one spends on it. This is a fallacy perpetuated by an industry and society that values commerce more than art. The value of art comes from how much the listener/viewer/participant enjoys the art, and from how the art impacts them.

  13. Just what the world needs – another troll comment in a website. Trolls giving away their wisdom in the Internets just says that they have no pride in their work and are willing to devalue intelligence for the rest of us. If this troll feels that his comment has no value, then why should anyone reply to it?

    Or should trolling should always be free?

  14. People making music for money as their sole basis for making music……that is so last century. F$%K THE RIAA and the whole system in which they rule.

  15. This is great: one out-of-touch guy gripes about something he doesn't understand, and a legion of intelligent comments swoop to defend it. Welcome to the future, old man!

  16. This is great: one out-of-touch guy gripes about something he doesn't understand, and a legion of intelligent comments swoop to defend it. Welcome to the future, old man!

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