Junkie XL + Jan Hammer’s The Fairlight EP

fairlight

Junkie XL and Jan Hammer have joined forces for The Fairlight EP, which will be released digitally on March 23rd.

The Fairlight EP contains 2 tracks:

  • Made For Each Other, a collaboration with the legendary Jan Hammer; and
  • Heart Of Darkness, which is Junkie XL on his own, picking up where Cosmic Rave left off.

Junkie XL + Jan Hammer is a strange combo, but it actually sounds pretty good.

Check it out below and let us know what you think!

And, if you’re a Hammer fan, don’t miss our classic Jan Hammer interview!

via APC, NSFW 24×7

18 thoughts on “Junkie XL + Jan Hammer’s The Fairlight EP

  1. I once thought disco would eventually die, but apparently, its going to keep eating the same brains until it dies of malnutrition, only to be re-re-re-packaged for the next wave of idiot kids. If Jan is going to revisit anything, it should at least have the zazz of his work with Al DiMeola. That's a vastly more interesting arena for a guy with his chops.

  2. I once thought disco would eventually die, but apparently, its going to keep eating the same brains until it dies of malnutrition, only to be re-re-re-packaged for the next wave of idiot kids. If Jan is going to revisit anything, it should at least have the zazz of his work with Al DiMeola. That's a vastly more interesting arena for a guy with his chops.

  3. Jan Hammer? Isn't he the guy who wrote the Miami Vice music 150 years ago?

    "Junkie XL + Jan Hammer is a strange combo"

    Yes, indeed. 🙂 Well, it sounds not too bad.

  4. Jan Hammer? Isn't he the guy who wrote the Miami Vice music 150 years ago?

    "Junkie XL + Jan Hammer is a strange combo"

    Yes, indeed. 🙂 Well, it sounds not too bad.

  5. One of my fave Jan Hammer works is the soundtrack to Beyond the Mind's Eye — it brims with gloriously melodic ideas, executed splendidly. You simply can't forget classics like "Seeds" or "Magic Theater" after watching the music videos.

    One thing I've wished of Jan Hammer (after listening to Snapshots 1.2 awhile back) is that his drums could be more punchy and that he would explore beyond the soundset of say, certain Korg machines. In some ways, it would be like imagining a world where Vangelis didn't have a CS-80.

    This is a pretty cool collaboration and I'm glad these two have been brought together, but it went too far in a certain direction: I lament that like previous Junkie XL releases, the dynamic range is painfully squashed. When the drums first kick in, they sound like they're crying for life and don't have more room to go.

    Most markedly, during the breakdown at 1:39 in the "Single Edit", the signature Hammer guitar-esque riffing distorts badly in an unpleasant way. A better middle ground of mastering between these two styles would've been ace.

  6. One of my fave Jan Hammer works is the soundtrack to Beyond the Mind's Eye — it brims with gloriously melodic ideas, executed splendidly. You simply can't forget classics like "Seeds" or "Theater of Magic" after watching the music videos.

    One thing I've wished of Jan Hammer (after listening to Snapshots 1.2 awhile back) is that his drums could be more punchy and that he would explore beyond the soundset of say, certain Korg machines. In some ways, it would be like imagining a world where Vangelis didn't have a CS-80.

    This is a pretty cool collaboration and I'm glad these two have been brought together, but it went too far in a certain direction: I lament that like previous Junkie XL releases, the dynamic range is painfully squashed. When the drums first kick in, they sound like they're crying for life and don't have more room to go.

    Most markedly, during the breakdown at 1:39 in the "Single Edit", the signature Hammer guitar-esque riffing distorts badly in an unpleasant way. A better middle ground of mastering between these two styles would've been ace.

    [youtube YT7W7hBj31c

    youtube]

  7. One of my fave Jan Hammer works is the soundtrack to Beyond the Mind's Eye — it brims with gloriously melodic ideas, executed splendidly. You simply can't forget classics like "Seeds" or "Theater of Magic" after watching the music videos.

    One thing I've wished of Jan Hammer (after listening to Snapshots 1.2 awhile back) is that his drums could be more punchy and that he would explore beyond the soundset of say, certain Korg machines. In some ways, it would be like imagining a world where Vangelis didn't have a CS-80.

    This is a pretty cool collaboration and I'm glad these two have been brought together, but it went too far in a certain direction: I lament that like previous Junkie XL releases, the dynamic range is painfully squashed. When the drums first kick in, they sound like they're crying for life and don't have more room to go.

    Most markedly, during the breakdown at 1:39 in the "Single Edit", the signature Hammer guitar-esque riffing distorts badly in an unpleasant way. A better middle ground of mastering between these two styles would've been ace.

    [youtube YT7W7hBj31c

    youtube]

  8. One of my fave Jan Hammer works is the soundtrack to Beyond the Mind's Eye — it brims with gloriously melodic ideas, executed splendidly. You simply can't forget classics like "Seeds" or "Theater of Magic" after watching the music videos.

    One thing I've wished of Jan Hammer (after listening to Snapshots 1.2 awhile back) is that his drums could be more punchy and that he would explore beyond the soundset of say, certain Korg machines. In some ways, it would be like imagining a world where Vangelis didn't have a CS-80.

    This is a pretty cool collaboration and I'm glad these two have been brought together, but it went too far in a certain direction: I lament that like previous Junkie XL releases, the dynamic range is painfully squashed. When the drums first kick in, they sound like they're crying for life and don't have more room to go.

    Most markedly, during the breakdown at 1:39 in the "Single Edit", the signature Hammer guitar-esque riffing distorts badly in an unpleasant way. A better middle ground of mastering between these two styles would've been ace.

    [youtube YT7W7hBj31c

    youtube]

  9. One of my fave Jan Hammer works is the soundtrack to Beyond the Mind's Eye — it brims with gloriously melodic ideas, executed splendidly. You simply can't forget classics like "Seeds" or "Theater of Magic" after watching the music videos.

    One thing I've wished of Jan Hammer (after listening to Snapshots 1.2 awhile back) is that his drums could be more punchy and that he would explore beyond the soundset of say, certain Korg machines. In some ways, it would be like imagining a world where Vangelis didn't have a CS-80.

    This is a pretty cool collaboration and I'm glad these two have been brought together, but it went too far in a certain direction: I lament that like previous Junkie XL releases, the dynamic range is painfully squashed. When the drums first kick in, they sound like they're crying for life and don't have more room to go.

    Most markedly, during the breakdown at 1:39 in the "Single Edit", the signature Hammer guitar-esque riffing distorts badly in an unpleasant way. A better middle ground of mastering between these two styles would've been ace.

    [youtube YT7W7hBj31c

    youtube]

  10. One of my fave Jan Hammer works is the soundtrack to Beyond the Mind's Eye — it brims with gloriously melodic ideas, executed splendidly. You simply can't forget classics like "Seeds" or "Theater of Magic" after watching the music videos.

    One thing I've wished of Jan Hammer (after listening to Snapshots 1.2 awhile back) is that his drums could be more punchy and that he would explore beyond the soundset of say, certain Korg machines. In some ways, it would be like imagining a world where Vangelis didn't have a CS-80.

    This is a pretty cool collaboration and I'm glad these two have been brought together, but it went too far in a certain direction: I lament that like previous Junkie XL releases, the dynamic range is painfully squashed. When the drums first kick in, they sound like they're crying for life and don't have more room to go.

    Most markedly, during the breakdown at 1:39 in the "Single Edit", the signature Hammer guitar-esque riffing distorts badly in an unpleasant way. A better middle ground of mastering between these two styles would've been ace.

    [youtube YT7W7hBj31c

    youtube]

  11. One of my fave Jan Hammer works is the soundtrack to Beyond the Mind's Eye — it brims with gloriously melodic ideas, executed splendidly. You simply can't forget classics like "Seeds" or "Magic Theater" after watching the music videos.

    One thing I've wished of Jan Hammer (after listening to Snapshots 1.2 awhile back) is that his drums could be more punchy and that he would explore beyond the soundset of say, certain Korg machines. In some ways, it would be like imagining a world where Vangelis didn't have a CS-80.

    This is a pretty cool collaboration and I'm glad these two have been brought together, but it went too far in a certain direction: I lament that like previous Junkie XL releases, the dynamic range is painfully squashed. When the drums first kick in, they sound like they're crying for life and don't have more room to go.

    Most markedly, during the breakdown at 1:39 in the "Single Edit", the signature Hammer guitar-esque riffing distorts badly in an unpleasant way. A better middle ground of mastering between these two styles would've been ace.

  12. One of my fave Jan Hammer works is the soundtrack to Beyond the Mind's Eye — it brims with gloriously melodic ideas, executed splendidly. You simply can't forget classics like "Seeds" or "Magic Theater" after watching the music videos.

    One thing I've wished of Jan Hammer (after listening to Snapshots 1.2 awhile back) is that his drums could be more punchy and that he would explore beyond the soundset of say, certain Korg machines. In some ways, it would be like imagining a world where Vangelis didn't have a CS-80.

    This is a pretty cool collaboration and I'm glad these two have been brought together, but it went too far in a certain direction: I lament that like previous Junkie XL releases, the dynamic range is painfully squashed. When the drums first kick in, they sound like they're crying for life and don't have more room to go.

    Most markedly, during the breakdown at 1:39 in the "Single Edit", the signature Hammer guitar-esque riffing distorts badly in an unpleasant way. A better middle ground of mastering between these two styles would've been ace.

  13. Fungo, would you really call this disco? I wouldn't and I'm a music guru. Contemporary instrumental groove, that's what this is. And me likey. And if you don't, well, poop on you.

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