Cool Opportunity For A Student To Program Open Source DJ Software This Summer!

mixxx_screen2_smallOpen source DJ software developer Mixxx has been accepted into Google’s Summer of Code 2010, and they’re looking for students developers:

If you’re a student with C++ experience, an interest in DJing, and enthusiasm about open source software, then we encourage you to apply to work on Mixxx for the summer! Mixxx is a great opportunity to gain useful experience not only with open source software development, but also with multithreading and realtime multimedia applications.

Mixxx previously participated in Google Summer of Code in 2007 and 2008, and saw the success of several projects like the new waveform widget, improved BPM detection, and our first library overhaul. We have an enthusiastic team of mentors supported by a great community of artists and developers, and we think we’ve got an intriguing list of project ideas for this year.

Sounds like it could be a cool opportunity. Get the details at the Mixxx site.

3 thoughts on “Cool Opportunity For A Student To Program Open Source DJ Software This Summer!

  1. Ever since this Google code summer appeared I've been skeptic about it, and that hasn't changed a bit. I'm a programmer myself, mainly Java, C/C++ and loosely javascript. As a side-note I'm also very proud that I'm managing quite well to pick up on Max/MSP (M4L) in a good pase.

    My beef with Google code camp is the use of the term "open source", as if open source would automatically imply that they're working on free software. That is not the case. The definition of "open source software (OSS) is that the project has adopted on of the many open source licenses. In basic all which is required is that the source code is made available to users of the software. But that doesn't have to stop anyone from providing the software for a fee. Quite on the contrary. The very essence of the ideas behind open source are based on freedom. Including the freedom to sell ones work.

    And it wouldn't be the first time where projects used Google code camp to quickly expand on their product (these "contests" are time based after all) only to lock things down after wards. I'm not insinuating that this would apply to Mixx, I don't know this project to make such claims, but merely pointing out that I've often see such things happen.

    Naturally its also possible that they're simply in need for programmers and need people to help them out. But then I can't raise some question marks and wonder why they didn't share their project on so called OSS development platforms. Sites like Sourceforge (http://www.sourceforge.net) or perhaps even google code (http://code.google.com). Use of such websites is bound to attract interested people, while still giving you plenty of options to keep control of your code.

    Alas, just my 2 cents here. And for the record, I am one of those people who is slowly getting a little suspicious about Google and their so called "do no evil" motto.

  2. Ever since this Google code summer appeared I've been skeptic about it, and that hasn't changed a bit. I'm a programmer myself, mainly Java, C/C++ and loosely javascript. As a side-note I'm also very proud that I'm managing quite well to pick up on Max/MSP (M4L) in a good pase.

    My beef with Google code camp is the use of the term "open source", as if open source would automatically imply that they're working on free software. That is not the case. The definition of "open source software (OSS) is that the project has adopted on of the many open source licenses. In basic all which is required is that the source code is made available to users of the software. But that doesn't have to stop anyone from providing the software for a fee. Quite on the contrary. The very essence of the ideas behind open source are based on freedom. Including the freedom to sell ones work.

    And it wouldn't be the first time where projects used Google code camp to quickly expand on their product (these "contests" are time based after all) only to lock things down after wards. I'm not insinuating that this would apply to Mixx, I don't know this project to make such claims, but merely pointing out that I've often see such things happen.

    Naturally its also possible that they're simply in need for programmers and need people to help them out. But then I can't raise some question marks and wonder why they didn't share their project on so called OSS development platforms. Sites like Sourceforge (http://www.sourceforge.net) or perhaps even google code (http://code.google.com). Use of such websites is bound to attract interested people, while still giving you plenty of options to keep control of your code.

    Alas, just my 2 cents here. And for the record, I am one of those people who is slowly getting a little suspicious about Google and their so called "do no evil" motto.

  3. Ever since this Google code summer appeared I've been skeptic about it, and that hasn't changed a bit. I'm a programmer myself, mainly Java, C/C++ and loosely javascript. As a side-note I'm also very proud that I'm managing quite well to pick up on Max/MSP (M4L) in a good pase.

    My beef with Google code camp is the use of the term "open source", as if open source would automatically imply that they're working on free software. That is not the case. The definition of "open source software (OSS) is that the project has adopted on of the many open source licenses. In basic all which is required is that the source code is made available to users of the software. But that doesn't have to stop anyone from providing the software for a fee. Quite on the contrary. The very essence of the ideas behind open source are based on freedom. Including the freedom to sell ones work.

    And it wouldn't be the first time where projects used Google code camp to quickly expand on their product (these "contests" are time based after all) only to lock things down after wards. I'm not insinuating that this would apply to Mixx, I don't know this project to make such claims, but merely pointing out that I've often see such things happen.

    Naturally its also possible that they're simply in need for programmers and need people to help them out. But then I can't raise some question marks and wonder why they didn't share their project on so called OSS development platforms. Sites like Sourceforge (http://www.sourceforge.net) or perhaps even google code (http://code.google.com). Use of such websites is bound to attract interested people, while still giving you plenty of options to keep control of your code.

    Alas, just my 2 cents here. And for the record, I am one of those people who is slowly getting a little suspicious about Google and their so called "do no evil" motto.

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