Toontrack Intros EZmix Mixing Tool

ezmix

Toontrack Music has introduced EZmix, an entry-level mixing tool for Windows and Mac.

Here’s what they have to say about it:

EZmix is a simple (EZ), yet powerful, mixing tool that gives you access to a huge array of mix presets for the whole gamut of mixing needs. Whether you need to mix drums, vocals, guitars, bass or keyboards this is your tool.

Simply connect EZmix to a channel strip in your sequencer like you would any plug-in, pick a preset for the instrument or sound on that strip. Done. For demo purposes or in full on production EZmix will cut your studio time, speed up and enhance your creative process from the initial hook to the final track.

EZmix is available now (VST/AU/RTAS) for 49 EUR or $69.

5 thoughts on “Toontrack Intros EZmix Mixing Tool

  1. I'm disappointed there isn't a demo version, perhttp://www.toontrack.com/forum/tm.aspx?m=94871 Official responses are too concerned with crippling a potential demo version instead of giving the artist a deep taste of what's possible.

    Sounds like Toontrack need to get onboard with what 112dB and some other forward-thinking companies are doing: releasing generous demos to get people hooked on and dependent on their products. That 112dB Redline Reverb was a fine example of me going, "Wow? 60 days with no limitations? That's remarkable!" Sure, as I went along, I froze and flattened tracks. But nonetheless, in a few weeks, Redline became an essential part of my mixes. Instead of 112dB frightening me off, they subversively (in the best of ways) nestled their roots into my audio brainstem.

    Spending resources on finding vocally positive customers (including ones who'll make fan vids of your products, heh) is far more useful than backing up in fear and being paralyzed, imagining pirates circling around you. Just as Ubisoft's repeatedly-cracked DRM shows, some people are money-deprived but time-rich. Burning time on them (and inevitable human nature) takes away from people who ARE willing to pay for your art (yes, plugins are art… suck it, Ebert).

    I don't like clicks or beeps in my demo versions either, but have some leeway with this: U-he ACE's crackle wasn't enough to put me off from doing a PROJECT PRESET and the price is remarkable. I don't own it because I don't currently have a need or an exploding desire, but the price is great (and widely commented on from the likes of Future Music and others).

    But even three weeks is a cool time period to get acquainted, look at Camel Audio Alchemy.

  2. I'm disappointed there isn't a demo version, perhttp://www.toontrack.com/forum/tm.aspx?m=94871 Official responses are too concerned with crippling a potential demo version instead of giving the artist a deep taste of what's possible.

    Sounds like Toontrack need to get onboard with what 112dB and some other forward-thinking companies are doing: releasing generous demos to get people hooked on and dependent on their products. That 112dB Redline Reverb was a fine example of me going, "Wow? 60 days with no limitations? That's remarkable!" Sure, as I went along, I froze and flattened tracks. But nonetheless, in a few weeks, Redline became an essential part of my mixes. Instead of 112dB frightening me off, they subversively (in the best of ways) nestled their roots into my audio brainstem.

    Spending resources on finding vocally positive customers (including ones who'll make fan vids of your products, heh) is far more useful than backing up in fear and being paralyzed, imagining pirates circling around you. Just as Ubisoft's repeatedly-cracked DRM shows, some people are money-deprived but time-rich. Burning time on them (and inevitable human nature) takes away from people who ARE willing to pay for your art (yes, plugins are art… suck it, Ebert).

    I don't like clicks or beeps in my demo versions either, but have some leeway with this: U-he ACE's crackle wasn't enough to put me off from doing a PROJECT PRESET and the price is remarkable. I don't own it because I don't currently have a need or an exploding desire, but the price is great (and widely commented on from the likes of Future Music and others).

    But even three weeks is a cool time period to get acquainted, look at Camel Audio Alchemy.

  3. I'm disappointed there isn't a demo version, perhttp://www.toontrack.com/forum/tm.aspx?m=94871 Official responses are too concerned with crippling a potential demo version instead of giving the artist a deep taste of what's possible.

    Sounds like Toontrack need to get onboard with what 112dB and some other forward-thinking companies are doing: releasing generous demos to get people hooked on and dependent on their products. That 112dB Redline Reverb was a fine example of me going, "Wow? 60 days with no limitations? That's remarkable!" Sure, as I went along, I froze and flattened tracks. But nonetheless, in a few weeks, Redline became an essential part of my mixes. Instead of 112dB frightening me off, they subversively (in the best of ways) nestled their roots into my audio brainstem.

    Spending resources on finding vocally positive customers (including ones who'll make fan vids of your products, heh) is far more useful than backing up in fear and being paralyzed, imagining pirates circling around you. Just as Ubisoft's repeatedly-cracked DRM shows, some people are money-deprived but time-rich. Burning time on them (and inevitable human nature) takes away from people who ARE willing to pay for your art (yes, plugins are art… suck it, Ebert).

    I don't like clicks or beeps in my demo versions either, but have some leeway with this: U-he ACE's crackle wasn't enough to put me off from doing a PROJECT PRESET and the price is remarkable. I don't own it because I don't currently have a need or an exploding desire, but the price is great (and widely commented on from the likes of Future Music and others).

    But even three weeks is a cool time period to get acquainted, look at Camel Audio Alchemy.

  4. I'm disappointed there isn't a demo version, perhttp://www.toontrack.com/forum/tm.aspx?m=94871 Official responses are too concerned with crippling a potential demo version instead of giving the artist a deep taste of what's possible.

    Sounds like Toontrack need to get onboard with what 112dB and some other forward-thinking companies are doing: releasing generous demos to get people hooked on and dependent on their products. That 112dB Redline Reverb was a fine example of me going, "Wow? 60 days with no limitations? That's remarkable!" Sure, as I went along, I froze and flattened tracks. But nonetheless, in a few weeks, Redline became an essential part of my mixes. Instead of 112dB frightening me off, they subversively (in the best of ways) nestled their roots into my audio brainstem.

    Spending resources on finding vocally positive customers (including ones who'll make fan vids of your products, heh) is far more useful than backing up in fear and being paralyzed, imagining pirates circling around you. Just as Ubisoft's repeatedly-cracked DRM shows, some people are money-deprived but time-rich. Burning time on them (and inevitable human nature) takes away from people who ARE willing to pay for your art (yes, plugins are art… suck it, Ebert).

    I don't like clicks or beeps in my demo versions either, but have some leeway with this: U-he ACE's crackle wasn't enough to put me off from doing a PROJECT PRESET and the price is remarkable. I don't own it because I don't currently have a need or an exploding desire, but the price is great (and widely commented on from the likes of Future Music and others).

    But even three weeks is a cool time period to get acquainted, look at Camel Audio Alchemy.

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