Avid Pro Tools 9 First Look

Avid has officially announced Pro Tools 9, the latest version of the popular music creation and audio production solution.

The big feature of Version 9 of Pro Tools is that it gives you the option to work with:

  • Avid audio interfaces
  • third-party audio interfaces, or
  • the built-in audio capabilities of a Mac or PC.

In other words – Avid has decided that Pro Tools 9 has to compete head-to-head with other software solutions.

Also, new support for the Avid EUCON open Ethernet protocol expands control surface options to include Avid’s Artist Series and Pro Series audio consoles and controllers (formerly known as Euphonix consoles and controllers).

Version 9 of the new Pro Tools and Pro Tools HD software will be available worldwide on November 12, 2010. Pricing starts at $599.

Here’s an overview of what’s new:

Open, flexible workflows to work the way you want

Customers can design their workflow of choice using the new Pro Tools software-only configuration with their favorite Avid or third-party audio interface—or standalone—and with Avid Artist and Pro Series controllers. The benefits to users include:

  • Versatile workflow design options—Enables customers to work the way they want using Pro Tools as a software only tool, or with hardware options that include either a variety of Avid audio interfaces for an Avid-advantaged workflow, or third-party audio interfaces as a result of new Core Audio and ASIO driver support.
  • EUCON support—Delivers more hands-on mixing options to customers using the new Pro Tools software offering or Pro Tools|HD systems with the ability to deeply control Pro Tools through EUCON integration using any Artist Series or Pro Series audio controller or console, in addition to Avid and third-party audio control surfaces.

More creative options with coveted, professional features now included as standard

As a result of customer requests, many high value features formerly available as add-ons are now available right out-of-the-box, including:

  • Automatic Delay Compensation—Equips customers using version 9 of Pro Tools with the ability to create better sounding mixes faster. Users can now mix and record with increased alignment and phase accuracy, without the need to manually compensate for latencies from hardware I/Os, internal and external routing, and plug-in algorithm processing—the number one request on the Pro Tools IdeaScale User Forum.
  • More audio tracks and busses—Allows customers to create more elaborate music and audio productions, with support for 96 mono or stereo voices in the new software-only version of Pro Tools (192 voices with Pro Tools HD systems), 256 internal busses, and 160 aux tracks.
  • Advanced production toolset—Gives customers access to standard professional tools in version 9 of Pro Tools to create more polished mixes out-of-the-box. Users can analyze and adjust timing across multiple tracks for tighter rhythm with the built-in multi-track Beat Detective™ module, improve organization and asset sharing with the DigiBase™ Pro file management tool, and save time with full Import Session Data dialog.
  • Collaborate with other audio and video software users more easily than ever

A series of audio for picture enhancements provides customers with the ability to easily collaborate with other audio and video software users, including:

  • OMF/AAF/MXF interchange and MP3 export—Provides customers with simplified session and file exchange between applications.
  • Built-in Time Code Ruler—Enables customers to achieve greater accuracy when syncing audio to video in post production (software only configuration of Pro Tools).
  • Updated 7.1 surround panner—Allows customers to more easily mix multichannel surround for full film sound production.
  • New variable stereo pan depths—Equips customers with authentic and precise track panning capabilities to achieve analog-console feel.

30 thoughts on “Avid Pro Tools 9 First Look

  1. Reminds me of Microsoft talking about the new features of Word. “Nothing much new, but a couple dialog boxes for some esoteric setting you’ll never need. P.S. we’re still charging as an upgrade.”

    1. Its a major upgrade, the ability to use any audio device is major, its like if you woke up one morning and had a full head of hair, j/k but it is that major.

  2. I’m still on 7.4 with a Digi OO2. I’m going to keep my setup this way. I use Logic if I don’t want to use a interface. If I get 9 for free then cool, but knowing digi/avid it won’t work with my 7.4 files anyway. Plus I like the 002 Sound.

  3. starting @ $599? so will people buying the mBox be getting a different version? How is $599 competitive? The part about using any interface is cool, but not if they are boosting the price $300 over what m-powered cost…

    WTF digi?

  4. If you research a few seconds, you'd find out that you no longer need their audio interface. Still requires ilok, but this opens the door to people who need more i/o but can't afford an 00x or hd.
    They also include delay compensation which to some is worth the upgrade alone.

    It's a different DAW market place now a days and everyone is fighting for position. Look at the new announcement of Sonar X1. Low priced, powerful daws with all the editing/recording features you could ask for. Without all the workarounds and limitations.

    This should have a lot of DAW companies nervous. You may even see some DAW companies disappear. You can only stay relevant if you're on or ahead of the curve these days. Playing catchup in a 64 bit world with 32 bit technology, just doesn't cut it.

    Buyers research and compare and it's easy to see those who will be left behind.

  5. very interesting. cross-grading for existing protools users is $250, but requires the $40 ilok.

    i almost bought the m box micro some time ago so i could edit mixes on the plane. pretty awesome to not need an interface now.

    since it's no longer proprietary hardware – anyone have recommendations? i have a digi003 rack right now and would love to sell it (goes for $800ish) to get a new, third party rack unit that does the same thing.

  6. I have hated my Mbox 2 second generation from day 1, now I can use any of my many audio devices without the hum and low power the Mbox 2 has, I have upgraded and yes PT 8 was clunky compared to 9.

  7. Please, do anybody know, if can the standard version of Pro Tools 9 be used with old Control|24 controller? It´s really important for me! 🙂
    Thanks for responses! JK

  8. "Along with C|24 and ICON*, you can now use Avid Artist Series and Pro Series consoles and controllers to enhance your editing and mixing workflow, thanks to added EUCON integration." -avid.com

  9. Yes, there are some terrible bugs in the midi/sequencer/editing-area in PT9. I really hope they fix this soon, 'cos I'm screaming with frustration. And 32bit, yesterdays computing… I have the 003 rack + factory (8 xlr's) and it's exellent! +65db gain with no noise, that's pretty good. I've been using PT since 1996 and the audio-area hasn't really changed that much, I mean PT3 looked very similar to, well at least PT7. The midi editing and virtual instruments has been added. In PT3 you could only import midi… PT3 was 32bit…back then…hey!! it's still 32bit…oh my god! Major drawback! But, I love PT audio functions, this is where PT shines.

  10. Yes, there are some terrible bugs in the midi/sequencer/editing-area in PT9. I really hope they fix this soon, 'cos I'm screaming with frustration. And 32bit, yesterdays computing… I have the 003 rack + factory (8 xlr's) and it's exellent! +65db gain with no noise, that's pretty good. I've been using PT since 1996 and the audio-area hasn't really changed that much, I mean PT3 looked very similar to, well at least PT7. The midi editing and virtual instruments has been added. In PT3 you could only import midi… PT3 was 32bit…back then…hey!! it's still 32bit…oh my god! Major drawback! But, I love PT audio functions, this is where PT shines.

  11. Yes, there are some terrible bugs in the midi/sequencer/editing-area in PT9. I really hope they fix this soon, 'cos I'm screaming with frustration. And 32bit, yesterdays computing… I have the 003 rack + factory (8 xlr's) and it's exellent! +65db gain with no noise, that's pretty good. I've been using PT since 1996 and the audio-area hasn't really changed that much, I mean PT3 looked very similar to, well at least PT7. The midi editing and virtual instruments has been added. In PT3 you could only import midi… PT3 was 32bit…back then…hey!! it's still 32bit…oh my god! Major drawback! But, I love PT audio functions, this is where PT shines.

  12. Yes, there are some terrible bugs in the midi/sequencer/editing-area in PT9. I really hope they fix this soon, 'cos I'm screaming with frustration. And 32bit, yesterdays computing… I have the 003 rack + factory (8 xlr's) and it's exellent! +65db gain with no noise, that's pretty good. I've been using PT since 1996 and the audio-area hasn't really changed that much, I mean PT3 looked very similar to, well at least PT7. The midi editing and virtual instruments has been added. In PT3 you could only import midi… PT3 was 32bit…back then…hey!! it's still 32bit…oh my god! Major drawback! But, I love PT audio functions, this is where PT shines.

  13. Yes, there are some terrible bugs in the midi/sequencer/editing-area in PT9. I really hope they fix this soon, 'cos I'm screaming with frustration. And 32bit, yesterdays computing… I have the 003 rack + factory (8 xlr's) and it's exellent! +65db gain with no noise, that's pretty good. I've been using PT since 1996 and the audio-area hasn't really changed that much, I mean PT3 looked very similar to, well at least PT7. The midi editing and virtual instruments has been added. In PT3 you could only import midi… PT3 was 32bit…back then…hey!! it's still 32bit…oh my god! Major drawback! But, I love PT audio functions, this is where PT shines.

  14. Yes, there are some terrible bugs in the midi/sequencer/editing-area in PT9. I really hope they fix this soon, 'cos I'm screaming with frustration. And 32bit, yesterdays computing… I have the 003 rack + factory (8 xlr's) and it's exellent! +65db gain with no noise, that's pretty good. I've been using PT since 1996 and the audio-area hasn't really changed that much, I mean PT3 looked very similar to, well at least PT7. The midi editing and virtual instruments has been added. In PT3 you could only import midi… PT3 was 32bit…back then…hey!! it's still 32bit…oh my god! Major drawback! But, I love PT audio functions, this is where PT shines.

  15. I've worked with PT since 95 or 96, and with Nuendo since version 1 in 2002. I still use both.
    I'll buy the native version to make our workflow more efficient. It should be a quicker solution for converting Pro Tools Session files, than opening them on a 002 / G5 stand alone box, exporting Broadcast Waves, and copying them to the PC for mix down in Nuendo 5 on my tweaked i7 64 bit workstation.
    By installing PT9 on my Nuendo workstation, we can quickly work on clients pro tools files (hit and run overdubs) and/or export Pro Tools tracks to wav files for mixing on the same workstation and hard drive array.
    By the way, the "real price" for PT 9 Native is $2,600 ($599 + $2,000 for Complete Production Toolkit) to be competitive with the features offered from Steinberg. If you are wondering about it,
    Nuendo 5, 64 bit, is the real deal! With SSL MADI 64 and X Logic Alpha Link Converters, it is a serious challenge to any HD system I've worked on, for a fraction of the cost, and lower priced VST plugs (vs TDM). With the difference in savings, I've purchased 2 UAD 2 Quad cards with most of the UA plug ins, and an SSL Duende expanded rig. We are also linking 2 additional used Macs and a Dual AMD via "Vienna Ensemble Pro" MIDI and Audio LAN solution for mixing with and integrating 32 bit PC and AU instruments or plug-ins. My entire investment is still leess than a comparable PT HD2 system, with more flexibility and IMOP better sounding.
    To agree with Jon, PT9 MIDI is still lame and buggy. We use both Logic 9 and Cubase 5.5 for MIDI production… they have fewer bugs and more features.
    WHEN WILL AVID GET US ARTIST SERIES DRIVERS FOR THE PC?

  16. I've worked with PT since 95 or 96, and with Nuendo since version 1 in 2002. I still use both.
    I'll buy the native version to make our workflow more efficient. It should be a quicker solution for converting Pro Tools Session files, than opening them on a 002 / G5 stand alone box, exporting Broadcast Waves, and copying them to the PC for mix down in Nuendo 5 on my tweaked i7 64 bit workstation.
    By installing PT9 on my Nuendo workstation, we can quickly work on clients pro tools files (hit and run overdubs) and/or export Pro Tools tracks to wav files for mixing on the same workstation and hard drive array.
    By the way, the "real price" for PT 9 Native is $2,600 ($599 + $2,000 for Complete Production Toolkit) to be competitive with the features offered from Steinberg. If you are wondering about it,
    Nuendo 5, 64 bit, is the real deal! With SSL MADI 64 and X Logic Alpha Link Converters, it is a serious challenge to any HD system I've worked on, for a fraction of the cost, and lower priced VST plugs (vs TDM). With the difference in savings, I've purchased 2 UAD 2 Quad cards with most of the UA plug ins, and an SSL Duende expanded rig. We are also linking 2 additional used Macs and a Dual AMD via "Vienna Ensemble Pro" MIDI and Audio LAN solution for mixing with and integrating 32 bit PC and AU instruments or plug-ins. My entire investment is still leess than a comparable PT HD2 system, with more flexibility and IMOP better sounding.
    To agree with Jon, PT9 MIDI is still lame and buggy. We use both Logic 9 and Cubase 5.5 for MIDI production… they have fewer bugs and more features.
    WHEN WILL AVID GET US ARTIST SERIES DRIVERS FOR THE PC?

  17. I've worked with PT since 95 or 96, and with Nuendo since version 1 in 2002. I still use both.
    I'll buy the native version to make our workflow more efficient. It should be a quicker solution for converting Pro Tools Session files, than opening them on a 002 / G5 stand alone box, exporting Broadcast Waves, and copying them to the PC for mix down in Nuendo 5 on my tweaked i7 64 bit workstation.
    By installing PT9 on my Nuendo workstation, we can quickly work on clients pro tools files (hit and run overdubs) and/or export Pro Tools tracks to wav files for mixing on the same workstation and hard drive array.
    By the way, the "real price" for PT 9 Native is $2,600 ($599 + $2,000 for Complete Production Toolkit) to be competitive with the features offered from Steinberg. If you are wondering about it,
    Nuendo 5, 64 bit, is the real deal! With SSL MADI 64 and X Logic Alpha Link Converters, it is a serious challenge to any HD system I've worked on, for a fraction of the cost, and lower priced VST plugs (vs TDM). With the difference in savings, I've purchased 2 UAD 2 Quad cards with most of the UA plug ins, and an SSL Duende expanded rig. We are also linking 2 additional used Macs and a Dual AMD via "Vienna Ensemble Pro" MIDI and Audio LAN solution for mixing with and integrating 32 bit PC and AU instruments or plug-ins. My entire investment is still leess than a comparable PT HD2 system, with more flexibility and IMOP better sounding.
    To agree with Jon, PT9 MIDI is still lame and buggy. We use both Logic 9 and Cubase 5.5 for MIDI production… they have fewer bugs and more features.
    WHEN WILL AVID GET US ARTIST SERIES DRIVERS FOR THE PC?

  18. I've worked with PT since 95 or 96, and with Nuendo since version 1 in 2002. I still use both.
    I'll buy the native version to make our workflow more efficient. It should be a quicker solution for converting Pro Tools Session files, than opening them on a 002 / G5 stand alone box, exporting Broadcast Waves, and copying them to the PC for mix down in Nuendo 5 on my tweaked i7 64 bit workstation.
    By installing PT9 on my Nuendo workstation, we can quickly work on clients pro tools files (hit and run overdubs) and/or export Pro Tools tracks to wav files for mixing on the same workstation and hard drive array.
    By the way, the "real price" for PT 9 Native is $2,600 ($599 + $2,000 for Complete Production Toolkit) to be competitive with the features offered from Steinberg. If you are wondering about it,
    Nuendo 5, 64 bit, is the real deal! With SSL MADI 64 and X Logic Alpha Link Converters, it is a serious challenge to any HD system I've worked on, for a fraction of the cost, and lower priced VST plugs (vs TDM). With the difference in savings, I've purchased 2 UAD 2 Quad cards with most of the UA plug ins, and an SSL Duende expanded rig. We are also linking 2 additional used Macs and a Dual AMD via "Vienna Ensemble Pro" MIDI and Audio LAN solution for mixing with and integrating 32 bit PC and AU instruments or plug-ins. My entire investment is still leess than a comparable PT HD2 system, with more flexibility and IMOP better sounding.
    To agree with Jon, PT9 MIDI is still lame and buggy. We use both Logic 9 and Cubase 5.5 for MIDI production… they have fewer bugs and more features.
    WHEN WILL AVID GET US ARTIST SERIES DRIVERS FOR THE PC?

  19. I've worked with PT since 95 or 96, and with Nuendo since version 1 in 2002. I still use both.
    I'll buy the native version to make our workflow more efficient. It should be a quicker solution for converting Pro Tools Session files, than opening them on a 002 / G5 stand alone box, exporting Broadcast Waves, and copying them to the PC for mix down in Nuendo 5 on my tweaked i7 64 bit workstation.
    By installing PT9 on my Nuendo workstation, we can quickly work on clients pro tools files (hit and run overdubs) and/or export Pro Tools tracks to wav files for mixing on the same workstation and hard drive array.
    By the way, the "real price" for PT 9 Native is $2,600 ($599 + $2,000 for Complete Production Toolkit) to be competitive with the features offered from Steinberg. If you are wondering about it,
    Nuendo 5, 64 bit, is the real deal! With SSL MADI 64 and X Logic Alpha Link Converters, it is a serious challenge to any HD system I've worked on, for a fraction of the cost, and lower priced VST plugs (vs TDM). With the difference in savings, I've purchased 2 UAD 2 Quad cards with most of the UA plug ins, and an SSL Duende expanded rig. We are also linking 2 additional used Macs and a Dual AMD via "Vienna Ensemble Pro" MIDI and Audio LAN solution for mixing with and integrating 32 bit PC and AU instruments or plug-ins. My entire investment is still leess than a comparable PT HD2 system, with more flexibility and IMOP better sounding.
    To agree with Jon, PT9 MIDI is still lame and buggy. We use both Logic 9 and Cubase 5.5 for MIDI production… they have fewer bugs and more features.
    WHEN WILL AVID GET US ARTIST SERIES DRIVERS FOR THE PC?

  20. I've worked with PT since 95 or 96, and with Nuendo since version 1 in 2002. I still use both.
    I'll buy the native version to make our workflow more efficient. It should be a quicker solution for converting Pro Tools Session files, than opening them on a 002 / G5 stand alone box, exporting Broadcast Waves, and copying them to the PC for mix down in Nuendo 5 on my tweaked i7 64 bit workstation.
    By installing PT9 on my Nuendo workstation, we can quickly work on clients pro tools files (hit and run overdubs) and/or export Pro Tools tracks to wav files for mixing on the same workstation and hard drive array.
    By the way, the "real price" for PT 9 Native is $2,600 ($599 + $2,000 for Complete Production Toolkit) to be competitive with the features offered from Steinberg. If you are wondering about it,
    Nuendo 5, 64 bit, is the real deal! With SSL MADI 64 and X Logic Alpha Link Converters, it is a serious challenge to any HD system I've worked on, for a fraction of the cost, and lower priced VST plugs (vs TDM). With the difference in savings, I've purchased 2 UAD 2 Quad cards with most of the UA plug ins, and an SSL Duende expanded rig. We are also linking 2 additional used Macs and a Dual AMD via "Vienna Ensemble Pro" MIDI and Audio LAN solution for mixing with and integrating 32 bit PC and AU instruments or plug-ins. My entire investment is still leess than a comparable PT HD2 system, with more flexibility and IMOP better sounding.
    To agree with Jon, PT9 MIDI is still lame and buggy. We use both Logic 9 and Cubase 5.5 for MIDI production… they have fewer bugs and more features.
    WHEN WILL AVID GET US ARTIST SERIES DRIVERS FOR THE PC?

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