Roland Intros V-Piano Grand

Roland V-Piano Grand

At the 2011 Winter NAMM ShowRoland U.S. introduce the new flagship of the V-Piano series, V-Piano Grand.

The new instrument combines V-Piano technology with a multi-channel sound system in a polished ebony grand piano cabinet, offering “unparalleled touch, playability, and sound for even the most discerning pianist”, according to the company.

At the heart of the V-Piano Grand is its component-based piano modeling technology, which recreates the complex interactions of the components inside an acoustic piano, resulting in “organic” grand-piano sound and performance.

Stepping up from the previous generation, the V-Piano Grand’s sound generator has been further improved, and new piano models have been added to the onboard library.

Features:

  • Roland’s revolutionary V-Piano modeling technology in a grand cabinet.
  • Onboard multi-channel sound system for true acoustic grand-piano sound.
  • Deluxe PHA III Ivory Feel Keyboard with Escapement.
  • Progressive Damper Action pedal for true acoustic grand-piano response.
  • Elegant, traditional grand-piano cabinet design.
  • New modeled pianos onboard fully optimized for the V-Piano Grand.

14 thoughts on “Roland Intros V-Piano Grand

  1. Wow, it's just like a – a – piano!

    This is an idea tt could spread to other orchestral instruments. "Hi, I'm the new second oboe player. Where's my power supply socket?"

  2. Wow, it's just like a – a – piano!

    This is an idea that could spread to other orchestral instruments. "Hi, I'm the new second oboe player. Where's my power supply socket?"

  3. I remember attending a conference in 1992 at the Peabody Hotel, Orlando. They had a Yamaha piano in the bar with electromechanical actuators on all of the keys and a digital memory. Every evening, a guy played the piano and it recorded his performance – to be repeated, with note-for-note perfection, the following afternoon, in his absence. With the keys and pedals operated invisibly. Kids used to wander up and try to touch the invisible player (if I put them up to it, of course).

  4. I remember attending a conference in 1992 at the Peabody Hotel, Orlando. They had a Yamaha piano in the bar with electromechanical actuators on all of the keys and a digital memory. Every evening, a guy played the piano and it recorded his performance – to be repeated, with note-for-note perfection, the following afternoon, in his absence. With the keys and pedals operated invisibly. Kids used to wander up and try to touch the invisible player (if I put them up to it, of course).

    This couldn't be that much fun.

  5. I remember attending a conference in 1992 at the Peabody Hotel, Orlando. They had a Yamaha piano in the bar with electromechanical actuators on all of the keys and a digital memory. Every evening, a guy played the piano for a couple of hours and it recorded his performance – to be repeated, with note-for-note perfection, the following afternoon, in his absence. With the keys and pedals operated invisibly. Kids used to wander up and try to touch the invisible player (if I put them up to it, of course).

    This couldn't be that much fun.

  6. Crazy expensive, yes, but I heard a performance on it and the sound is amazingly realistic. It’s built-in speakers filled a 40 60 foot room without need for other amplification and when I tried it myself, I found it very responsive and satisfying. So the u Kaye benefits are about it’s relative portability a its variety of voices. You can style it’s touch, tuning and tonality far more subtly than with other synths and it is a very elegant instrument to behold. Perhaps the first piano to deliver a believable performance for audiences, response for the player and relative portability for touring. And one crazy expensive ground-breaker.

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