Is LoopJ The New Standard For Dance Music?

This video captures a speech at the international music conference MIDEMNet by Ilya Playunov, CEO of Amidio, discussing a new standard for distributing dance music, .loopj.

There are two main parts to the new standard:

  • .loopj is a new format that breaks music into five layers: bass, beat, lead, atmosphere and rest. For the four sound layers, producers can deliver multiple loops.
  • LoopJ is a new player that supports .loopj file playback.

Here’s a demo video of the application LoopJ in action:

While I’m a firm believer that we need new standards for distributing music, I’m not convinced that .loopj is enough of a leap forward, based on this presentation. I’d like to see new formats include not only vertical splitting of the layers of a mix, but also horizontal splitting of the form or structure of a track, advanced meta data and support for reactive and generative elements.

LoopJ does look like fun, though.

Check out the demos and let us know what you think of .loopj as a format, and LoopJ as a playback tool.

9 thoughts on “Is LoopJ The New Standard For Dance Music?

  1. I support anything that further removes DJs from anything resembling creative endeavor. With all the prep and practice time this saves them, they can pick out even cooler t-shirts and style their hair just right! .loopj is the perfect trendy tool for trendy tools. 🙂

  2. LoopJ seems more of a consumer tool – but the hate for DJs is unwarranted and suggests that you're ignorant of the fact that many DJs are also producers and of the ways that modern DJs are doing live remixing of tracks.

  3. Hate for DJs?!

    You've got me all wrong! I think DJs are the best! It takes real talent to match BPM, and even more talent to pick two indiscernible pop-chart hits that go well together! DJs have to be skilled, as their audiences are such discerning folk, and not at all inebriated and entrenched in disposable pop-culture ethos of the almighty Top 40. To be sure, DJs are some of the most important and revered artists around, and not even remotely conceited or useless.

    Good heavens. "Hate for DJs!" What a silly notion.

  4. People with these multi-stemmed formats show up every few years and claim it's going to revolutionise everything, and then they disappear and are never heard from again. It's only really something you want for a remix or possibly a dj market. As a producer/artist, you generally spend ages getting those levels right, you don't want people messing with them.

  5. People with these multi-stemmed formats show up every few years and claim it's going to revolutionise everything, and then they disappear and are never heard from again. It's only really something you want for a remix or possibly a dj market. As a producer/artist, you generally spend ages getting those levels right, you don't want people messing with them, and as a listener, I want the optimal listening experience, not a group of tracks that i have to fiddle with for each track to set it to what i think sounds best.

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