Music Computing Intros LokBOX Data Vault For Musicians

Music Computing has introduced a LokBox – a ‘personal data vault’ for musicians.

It’s unique, as far as we know – an 18 gauge steel case that contains a USB 2.0 hub for use with up to 4 USB devices. It can be locked using the keys provided, and a security cable is included so the LokBOX can be chained to any support structure for more security.

It can also be equipped with an optional 500GB SSD Hybrid hard drive for data storage.

“We hear about security all the time, but usually only react when things have gone wrong,” said Victor Wong, CEO, Music Computing, “LokBOX is a simple and elegant way to be proactive about the privacy of your personal data.”

Price for the LokBOX is $99. An optional 500GB SSD Hybrid drive is available for $199.

19 thoughts on “Music Computing Intros LokBOX Data Vault For Musicians

  1. Victor Wong is trouble. I've met him personally as I live in Austin and am involved in the Computer Music Industry locally.

    Read this article: http://futuremusic.com/blog/2010/08/02/the-collap

    His last company Open Labs went under because his products were basically just a PC+Audio Interface+Midi controller all in one for TONS of money, way overpriced. After it went down he went to Livid to get the manufacturing for his new company Music Computing. The article above states, "Considering the 26 impending lawsuits that he will most likely field in the coming months, the industry will probably not hear from Victor Wong again…" but i guess they were wrong.

  2. Victor Wong is trouble. I've met him personally as I live in Austin and am involved in the Computer Music Industry locally.

    Read this article: http://futuremusic.com/blog/2010/08/02/the-collap

    His last company Open Labs went under because his products were basically just a PC+Audio Interface+Midi controller all in one for TONS of money, way overpriced. After it went down he went to Livid to get the manufacturing for his new company Music Computing. The article above states, "Considering the 26 impending lawsuits that he will most likely field in the coming months, the industry will probably not hear from Victor Wong again…" but i guess they were wrong.

  3. Victor Wong is trouble. I've met him personally as I live in Austin and am involved in the Computer Music Industry locally.

    Read this article: http://futuremusic.com/blog/2010/08/02/the-collap

    His last company Open Labs went under because his products were basically just a PC+Audio Interface+Midi controller all in one for TONS of money, way overpriced. After it went down he went to Livid to get the manufacturing for his new company Music Computing. The article above states, "Considering the 26 impending lawsuits that he will most likely field in the coming months, the industry will probably not hear from Victor Wong again…" but i guess they were wrong.

  4. Victor Wong is trouble. I've met him personally as I live in Austin and am involved in the Computer Music Industry locally.

    Read this article: http://futuremusic.com/blog/2010/08/02/the-collap

    His last company Open Labs went under because his products were basically just a PC+Audio Interface+Midi controller all in one for TONS of money, way overpriced. After it went down he went to Livid to get the manufacturing for his new company Music Computing. The article above states, "Considering the 26 impending lawsuits that he will most likely field in the coming months, the industry will probably not hear from Victor Wong again…" but i guess they were wrong.

  5. Victor Wong is trouble. I've met him personally as I live in Austin and am involved in the Computer Music Industry locally.

    Read this article: http://futuremusic.com/blog/2010/08/02/the-collap

    His last company Open Labs went under because his products were basically just a PC+Audio Interface+Midi controller all in one for TONS of money, way overpriced. After it went down he went to Livid to get the manufacturing for his new company Music Computing. The article above states, "Considering the 26 impending lawsuits that he will most likely field in the coming months, the industry will probably not hear from Victor Wong again…" but i guess they were wrong.

  6. Victor Wong is trouble. I've met him personally as I live in Austin and am involved in the Computer Music Industry locally.

    Read this article: http://futuremusic.com/blog/2010/08/02/the-collap

    His last company Open Labs went under because his products were basically just a PC+Audio Interface+Midi controller all in one for TONS of money, way overpriced. After it went down he went to Livid to get the manufacturing for his new company Music Computing. The article above states, "Considering the 26 impending lawsuits that he will most likely field in the coming months, the industry will probably not hear from Victor Wong again…" but i guess they were wrong.

  7. gonna live forever

    That safe you linked to weighs 21 lbs – because it's a safe.

    It looks like Music Computing had different design goals for this thing.

    Watchout

    Music Computing will live or die on Wong's ability to build a reputation for the company with musicians.

  8. This seems pointless to me too. Much cheaper and safer to store your data offsite via secure FTP or cloud-based service.

  9. Is this a problem that needs solving? On gigs, I'm not toting a pile of external drives that need locking up, and if someone breaks into my studio, then hell….I've got a BIGGER problem than the loss of my harddrives. Seems a laptop with a lock, a burglar alarm, and a good insurance policy would cover this a lot better than a shady businessman with an overpriced steel cable.

  10. Actually, I think they had the same design goal: physical security. This is a terrible physical security product because once it's taken from you ( http://www.amazon.com/Buffalo-Tools-BC36-36-Inch-… ) and time is no longer a factor, opening it will not be much of a challenge. ( http://www.amazon.com/Black-Decker-7152-3-0-Amp-R… )

    Security is a balancing act. I wasn't seriously suggesting anyone carry around a safe to gigs… I was merely using it as an example to point out how laughably ineffectual the LokBox is at the task compared to less expensive options from proven manufacturers that will actually still exist in five years. I'm assuming you're not an infirm grandmother and are just pointing out the weight as if it were an issue because you're used to thinking about products as gadgetry, but lightness and ease of concealment are not desirable attributes in a physical anti-theft system. I won't insult your intelligence by explaining why.

    Consider also that this is an issue of data security, and hardware encryption becomes ESSENTIAL.

    The LokBox is overpriced and useless for the very purpose it was created: physical security. They didn't even spring for a Kensington lock; a cable loop?? Seriously? Music Computing is taking advantage of their customers.

    P.S.: If you actually have a physical disability, I apologize for the infirm grandmother crack 🙂

  11. Actually, I think they had the same design goal: physical security. This is a terrible physical security product because once it's taken from you ( http://www.amazon.com/Buffalo-Tools-BC36-36-Inch-… ) and time is no longer a factor, opening it will not be much of a challenge. ( http://www.amazon.com/Black-Decker-7152-3-0-Amp-R… )

    Security is a balancing act. I wasn't seriously suggesting anyone carry around a safe to gigs… I was merely using it as an example to point out how laughably ineffectual the LokBox is at the task compared to less expensive options from proven manufacturers that will actually still exist in five years. I'm assuming you're not an infirm grandmother and are just pointing out the weight as if it were an issue because you're used to thinking about products as gadgetry, but lightness and ease of concealment are not desirable attributes in a physical anti-theft system. I won't insult your intelligence by explaining why.

    Consider also that this is an issue of data security, and hardware encryption becomes ESSENTIAL.

    The LokBox is overpriced and useless for the very purpose it was created: physical security. They didn't even spring for a Kensington lock; a cable loop?? Seriously? Music Computing is taking advantage of their customers.

    P.S.: If you actually have a physical disability, I apologize for the infirm grandmother crack 🙂

  12. Actually, I think they had the same design goal: physical security. This is a terrible physical security product because once it's taken from you ( http://www.amazon.com/Buffalo-Tools-BC36-36-Inch-… ) and time is no longer a factor, opening it will not be much of a challenge. ( http://www.amazon.com/Black-Decker-7152-3-0-Amp-R… )

    Security is a balancing act. I wasn't seriously suggesting anyone carry around a safe to gigs… I was merely using it as an example to point out how laughably ineffectual the LokBox is at the task compared to less expensive options from proven manufacturers that will actually still exist in five years. I'm assuming you're not an infirm grandmother and are just pointing out the weight as if it were an issue because you're used to thinking about products as gadgetry, but lightness and ease of concealment are not desirable attributes in a physical anti-theft system. I won't insult your intelligence by explaining why.

    Consider also that this is an issue of data security, and hardware encryption becomes ESSENTIAL.

    The LokBox is overpriced and useless for the very purpose it was created: physical security. They didn't even spring for a Kensington lock; a cable loop?? Seriously? Music Computing is taking advantage of their customers.

    P.S.: If you actually have a physical disability, I apologize for the infirm grandmother crack 🙂

  13. Actually, I think they had the same design goal: physical security. This is a terrible physical security product because once it's taken from you ( http://www.amazon.com/Buffalo-Tools-BC36-36-Inch-… ) and time is no longer a factor, opening it will not be much of a challenge. ( http://www.amazon.com/Black-Decker-7152-3-0-Amp-R… )

    Security is a balancing act. I wasn't seriously suggesting anyone carry around a safe to gigs… I was merely using it as an example to point out how laughably ineffectual the LokBox is at the task compared to less expensive options from proven manufacturers that will actually still exist in five years. I'm assuming you're not an infirm grandmother and are just pointing out the weight as if it were an issue because you're used to thinking about products as gadgetry, but lightness and ease of concealment are not desirable attributes in a physical anti-theft system. I won't insult your intelligence by explaining why.

    Consider also that this is an issue of data security, and hardware encryption becomes ESSENTIAL.

    The LokBox is overpriced and useless for the very purpose it was created: physical security. They didn't even spring for a Kensington lock; a cable loop?? Seriously? Music Computing is taking advantage of their customers.

    P.S.: If you actually have a physical disability, I apologize for the infirm grandmother crack 🙂

  14. Actually, I think they had the same design goal: physical security. This is a terrible physical security product because once it's taken from you ( http://www.amazon.com/Buffalo-Tools-BC36-36-Inch-… ) and time is no longer a factor, opening it will not be much of a challenge. ( http://www.amazon.com/Black-Decker-7152-3-0-Amp-R… )

    Security is a balancing act. I wasn't seriously suggesting anyone carry around a safe to gigs… I was merely using it as an example to point out how laughably ineffectual the LokBox is at the task compared to less expensive options from proven manufacturers that will actually still exist in five years. I'm assuming you're not an infirm grandmother and are just pointing out the weight as if it were an issue because you're used to thinking about products as gadgetry, but lightness and ease of concealment are not desirable attributes in a physical anti-theft system. I won't insult your intelligence by explaining why.

    Consider also that this is an issue of data security, and hardware encryption becomes ESSENTIAL.

    The LokBox is overpriced and useless for the very purpose it was created: physical security. They didn't even spring for a Kensington lock; a cable loop?? Seriously? Music Computing is taking advantage of their customers.

    P.S.: If you actually have a physical disability, I apologize for the infirm grandmother crack 🙂

  15. Actually, I think they had the same design goal: physical security. This is a terrible physical security product because once it's taken from you ( http://www.amazon.com/Buffalo-Tools-BC36-36-Inch-… ) and time is no longer a factor, opening it will not be much of a challenge. ( http://www.amazon.com/Black-Decker-7152-3-0-Amp-R… )

    Security is a balancing act. I wasn't seriously suggesting anyone carry around a safe to gigs… I was merely using it as an example to point out how laughably ineffectual the LokBox is at the task compared to less expensive options from proven manufacturers that will actually still exist in five years. I'm assuming you're not an infirm grandmother and are just pointing out the weight as if it were an issue because you're used to thinking about products as gadgetry, but lightness and ease of concealment are not desirable attributes in a physical anti-theft system. I won't insult your intelligence by explaining why.

    Consider also that this is an issue of data security, and hardware encryption becomes ESSENTIAL.

    The LokBox is overpriced and useless for the very purpose it was created: physical security. They didn't even spring for a Kensington lock; a cable loop?? Seriously? Music Computing is taking advantage of their customers.

    P.S.: If you actually have a physical disability, I apologize for the infirm grandmother crack 🙂

  16. heads up, for anyone planning on using that 500 GB SSD hybrid drive for audio…they SUCK! i had a Seagate Momentus XT 500 GB hybrid SSD and had to return it. Constant dropouts in Pro Tools. I switched to a regular 500 GB HDD and it works like a dream now. BEWARE! not good for music

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