Roland JX-03 Synthesizer Sound Examples


This video, via Roland product specialist, Ed Diaz, explores the sound capabilities of the new Roland JX-03 Boutique synthesizer:

The Roland Boutique JX-03 module continues the legacy of the JX-3P synth. The original model was launched when button-driven interfaces were popular, so it was designed to give immediate access to preset sounds. It was actually highly programmable though, especially when used with the PG-200 controller that added 24 rotary knobs for instant sonic sculpting.

The 4-voice JX-03 inherits all 24 knobs from the PG-200, as well as the distinctive JX tonal character. Roland also added some extras not present in the JX-3P including new waveforms, expanded DCO range and cross modulation options. You can also slide the JX-03 into the K-25m keyboard unit (not included) for a self-contained, go-anywhere synth experience.

The Roland JX-03 Synthesizer Module has a street price of about US $299. For more information on the JX-03 and the other instruments in the Boutique synth series, consult the Roland US website.


17 thoughts on “Roland JX-03 Synthesizer Sound Examples

  1. Pretty decent emulation for all intents and purposes.. But I think a lot of plugins smoke this thing in terms of synthesis capabilities and cost only a fraction of the price.

    1. the plugin itself may be a fraction BUT the cost of the computer is not
      I have found the plugin need horsepower to run real good, the computer will not be cheap
      And there is the price of the good plugins, some are not that much cheaper
      Plus computer route has stability questions

      I would say the market for these synths are performers who need the flavor of sounds but not the bulk

      1. Throw in the cost of a dedicated, pre-mapped midi controller with all the same knobs/sliders and it would be about the same cost. The next best thing in roland emulation would be the TAL vst plugins, and heres a link for a custom midi controller to actually use that plugin which costs around $200+

        So basically its the same only this version is stand-alone…

    2. However — Plug-ins don’t have their own dedicated control panel, they can’t operate in stand-alone mode, they have no resale value, and there’s a high chance that they won’t even run on computers made 10 years from now.

    3. this kind of argument is silly, kids

      apples and oranges.. software is good at software things, hardware is good at hardware things

      open your mind to the nuances of reality, expand your horizons beyond this “either / or” black and white view of “PLUGINS VS STUFF!”… it wont do you any good

  2. hate to say this, but this sounds allot better than the JU-06, allot more different sounds

    This is what a demo should be like, give you the idea of the flavors of sound

    1. unless you have small hands
      this is a Asian based company ?
      (because Caucasians are just too big) , movie “crazy people” with Dudley Moore (double ref)

  3. During the 90’s I worked as an engineer on several sessions with Bertico Sosa, one of the legendary salsa producers of the Dominican Republic. He had a single synthesizer and it was a JX-3P with the PG programmer (hey, it was the 90’s, it was the DR). He didn’t quite know how to program it though, so I had to roll up my sleeves and dig into it several times. Again, this video brought back A LOT of memories. The job of replicating the JX is very well done. Gear lust sets in.

  4. Is it just me, or is it just the guy doing the demo, but these seem to lack a bit of subtlety in the filter cut off. It’s all or nothing when he turns that knob. For my ears, I much prefer the Ju-06.

  5. I’m in the market for a poly synth module to keep permanently hooked into a MIDI keyboard I keep in my GF’s loft to play with when I’m there. If only this had the original 6 voices I’d be interested but 4 is just too limiting and hooking 2 of these together really defeats the benefits of small size. I think I”ll just build a 6 voice Ambika instead.

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