Moog Sub 37 Editor Now Available


Moog Music has released the Sub 37 Editor as a free download for owners of the Sub 37.

The Sub 37 Editor operates as a plugin (VST, AU, RTAS, and AAX Compatible) or standalone, providing quick access to the Sub 37’s hardware parameters, while also letting you control the Sub 37’s analog circuits from your DAW.

The editor also comes with over 250 new presets, including four banks by Trash Audio artists: Alessandro Cortini, Surachai Sutthisasanakul, Justin McGrath, and Richard Devine.

Note: In order for your Sub 37 to have full compatibility with the editor, you must update it to the latest firmware version. OS X and Windows Firmware Updater apps are included with the download (.zip).

47 thoughts on “Moog Sub 37 Editor Now Available

    1. It would be so cool to have the Sub 37 editor as a standalone soft synth provided that you enter some sort of code to prove you bought the Sub 37 analog synth.

  1. The bugginess of Minitaur editor was mad disappointing. Constant visits to Crash City. Still want Sub37, eventually/someday.

    1. One use for the editor is to study how the presets are made. The knobs on the hardware synth don’t move when you load a preset, so it’s hard to tell exactly what settings go into making a particular preset sound. The knob images on the editor DO move when you load a preset, so you can see the values.

      It also makes the “hidden” functions easier to get to. Pretty much everything in the lower 1/3 of the editor GUI is stuff that requires either menu diving or some sort of alternate functionality activation on the hardware.

    2. Since it is a plug-in, you should be able to automate parameters and use all your DAW sequencer features to control it, as well as save patches within DAW project files.

    3. The approach to the sequencer is easier, as well as naming patches and accessing some of the modulation matrix options.

  2. Just wondering why now and so often the comment “why we need software, when can use your hands” is made and what the added value of such comment is. Are software and hardware control for some reason not allowed to co-exist and therefor people should not have access to software editors ? There are several valid reasons for software/editors:

    A. Quickly save/restore patch to and from the PC and also organize them (in banks/librarians)
    B. Turning knobs on software can be faster than hardware and experimenting this way can be serious fun too.
    C. Recalling the settings of a patch and see the knob settings how a patch was made can be very educational. (not all of us are sound experts)
    D. Software can be more intuitive and faster than to edit menu settings on a small display.
    E. Software can provide more information on certain controls/settings than the text on the product itself.

    Wish there was a free editor like this for the Voyager. Hope there will be a Sub37 RME someday but with so many knobs probably pretty unlikely.

    1. You bring some good points for sure. There are arguments for both sides. The thing is, it’s a wonderful thing to be able to play an instrument in a completely physical way, without any distraction from a computer screen,mouse, etc. I can appreciate what the editor brings to the table, but for me it is more part of a “maintenance” kind of mode, amd to some extend to fine tune certain sounds. As a matter of fact, I have the ST editor for my P’08 module (which is nowhere as bad as some people say), but I use it only for specific tasks. Otherwise, it gets a little schizophrenic ????. So when I play, I play. To each his/her own I guess.

  3. A long time comin’. I think Moog wanted to do this right this time. Its been in beta for like…forever. Hopefully its stable. Thanks Moog!

  4. This is brilliant. Having patches saved within the daw-project is freakin awesome!
    I hope this sets a cross brand standard.
    Way to go Moog.

  5. All hardware synths in today’s world should have a software editor …above all else you want to go in and see how the patched are set…that is HUGE>…i cant tell you how many times i’ve sat there with the knobs on “catch” trying to figure out where the settings of the factory patch were..

    and saving patches with software provides an extra layer of usability and dependabilty (assuming no bugs!!)

  6. I find it delightful to see people who go on about how hardware synths are the only way to go, get super excited when they get software to control said hardware.

    1. Well, I think hardware is the way to go. I won’t gig with a computer. However, using one at home to overcome some hardware limitations is perfectly fine and very welcome

      1. I’m not arguing any pros/cons. Just pointing out how the communication of most hard core “analog guys” is pretty folded in on itself.

        1. i use hardware when i make music and if i use Ableton the plug ins for the sub phatty and miniatur are very useful. best of both programing worlds. and if you don’t like it its just an extra. not sure y so many unfriendly synth players are on here spreading bad vibes.

    2. I’m pretty sure the ‘analog guys’ are mostly referring to the sound of true analog hardware. I am a hardware guy to the end, but that doesn’t mean I don’t absolutely appreciate and welcome the benefits of software editors for many of the reasons already mentioned. Besides, there were editors for hardware long before the hardware vs software synth debate…

  7. wow! great! hopefully the Minitaur issues will be figured out soon and next, hear a lot of complaining about that one! But thanks Moog for adding value to your products!

  8. This is great!
    I will probably be using it mainly for librarian functions, but also for studying how different patches are put together.
    Just the other day I recorded a midi track using my SUB 37 (software v. 1.1.1) and made great use of the fact that all knob movements during recording were recorded, too. Afterwards, I went into the track editor and adjusted a few things. The result still brings a tingle to my spine out of sheer joy every time I hear the track played back. I just love that instrument!

  9. For me the editor is useful as a librarian, for quick naming and organising sounds and for a quick view of the modulation settings on sounds I’ve made, it’s so easy to forget what you did when creating patches. It’s a great addition.

  10. It even partially works on Windows XP! except you cannot asses patches inside of sub37 from software editor, but you can load sounds from the library and control all the parameters from software editor! VST version does not crash DAW as, for example, VST soundtower editor for DSI Pophet 08 ( although standalone version works just fine) . Nice work Moog!

  11. Don’t hate me. I like to keep laptops out of the scene when creating music, but like an addict, one is never far away. An iPad of course is a similar type of distraction, but I’d like to see this librarian/editor there too. I’m assuming a midi cable would be all I need to interface with the Sub37, and a midi out from an iOS device isn’t that rare anymore… I’d really like an iOS version of the editor. Anyone else?

  12. Installed it with success (bar some retries caused by a dodgy USB cable – uh-oh), and tested it.

    Initial observations:

    Needs a firmware update of the Sub 37 (included in package) in order to work – no problem, as long as the USB cable is ok 🙂
    A big thank you to the good people at Moog Music for foreseeing many kinds of errors during software update. The sys-ex transfer stopped halfway through (that $#|+ cabl again!!) But I was able to update once the cale problems were sorted out.

    Needs a new USB driver for Windows in order to have the Editor and a DAW access the synth at the same time – again, hassle-free install. Windows restart recommended.

    Stand-alone version of the Editor works straight out of the box – no installation needed. The stand-alone version creates a couple of folders in the Windows User area for storing patches. Downloading patches from the Sub 37 to the Editor is smooth, and works as fast as the MIDI protocol will allow. Patches selected in the Editor may be sent to the panel memory of the Sub 37 immediately without touching the stored patches – great for browsing a large set of presets. Access to parameters buried in the Sub 37 menues is fast thanks to every parameter being mapped in the Editor.

    VST plugin version of the Editor may be copied as a .dll to the VST folder of your choice, works as an insert plugin in an audio track in your DAW (I use Cubase 8.5). (strange, unintuitive way of handling it, but it actually makes sense) The sub 37 connects normally via its (new) USB driver, and the editor is configured to work in parallel with this behaviour – hence the need for the new USB driver.

    All in all, the Editor works stably and reliably. Apart from the few quirks mentioned it has the quality and intuitive feel you would expect from a Moog product.

    If you have a Sub 37, this free piece of software comes highly recommended.

  13. Is there any reason why the Sub 37 editor doesn’t show up as a plugin? Neither the 32, nor the 64bit version are working for me. Both Cubase and FL Studio do not recognize the plugin as a plugin. The standalone version works fine. Please help! 🙁

    1. Did you ever get it sorted out with FL?
      I’m really interested in the Sub 37 but I’ve heard that you can’t control all parameters via FL.

    2. 1. make sure the .dll file is copied to a VST folder that your DAW scans
      2. create an *Audio* track and search for the Sub 37 plugin as an *FX*

      I thought there was a problem with the plugin version as well, but the trick is you don’t use it as a VSTi (plugin/Instrument track). You create an *Audio* track and then search for it as an *effect*.

      Counterintuitive IMO. But works.

  14. Hello

    Anyone tried to edit the sequence in the editor? My Sub 37 is hooked up and functions from the editor plug in, but when changing sequence paremters like not pitch, nothing happens. Anyone come across this, Probably user error.

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