iTrack Dock Overview & Demo

At this year’s NAMM Show, Focusrite introduced the iTrack Dock, an iPad docking system for musicians. It’s now available, with a street price of about US $200.

This video offers an overview of the iTrack Dock and demo of how it works.

Note: The first 4 minutes focus on unboxing and registering the device. A technical demo follows.  Continue reading

One Square Inch of Silence – Preserving The Last ‘Quiet Places’

This video, One Square Inch of Silence, takes a ‘listening journey’ with professional sound recordist Gordon Hempton to a Hoh Rain Forest location in Olympic National Park.

Hempton is an acoustic ecologist, interested in preserving not just the way the earth naturally looks, but how it naturally sounds. While audio ecology and synthesis may seem unrelated, both are concerned with consciously exploring and preserving sound.  Continue reading

Zoom Intros H5 Handy Recorder

zoom-h5-recorderZoom has introduced the H5 Handy Recorder, their latest portable audio recorder and audio interface.

Similar to the H6 flagship that was announced last summer, the H5 employs a system of interchangeable input capsules, allowing the right microphone to be used for the right situation.

In addition to being fully compatible with all Zoom input capsules, the H5 comes with a new X/Y stereo capsule, featuring extended signal capacity—up to 140 dB SPL—and shockmounted microphones for reduced handling noise.

Here’s a video introduction to the Zoom H5: Continue reading

Acoustic Treatment For Home Studios

Mastering engineering Ian Shepherd takes a look at studio acoustic treatment in the latest of his video series on Building a Home Mastering Studio.

While Shepherd’s goal is to be able to do useful mastering tasks in his home studio, much of the information will be useful to anyone planning a home studio.  Continue reading

Don’t Drool On Your Keyboard: Inside LA Home Recording Studios

awesome-home-studios

An article in Curbed LA takes a look at the “underground world” of Los Angeles’ home-based recording studios.

Home recording studios, along with “bootblack stands, rubber or metal stamp stores, typewriter or adding machine repair concerns,” aren’t officially allowed in LA. But home-based professional recording studios, well-soundproofed for acoustic reasons to begin with, seem to escape the building inspectors’ scrutiny — as long as the neighbors don’t notice and complain. Continue reading