Damon Albarn, Brian Eno & Africa Express Do Terry Riley’s ‘In C Mali’

While much of minimalist composer Terry Riley‘s work has been electronic, his seminal In C is for any number of people and any instruments.

In C Mali, described as ‘the first African version of Riley’s minimalist classic’, was recorded in Bamako, Mali in October 2013. This new version features artists from Bamako & western guests (Brian Eno, Damon Albarn and others) led by conductor Andre de Ridder.  Continue reading

New Daniel Lanois Album, Flesh And Machine

daniel-lanois-flesh-and-machineProducer and performer Daniel Lanois has a new album out, Flesh And Machine.

According to label Anti-, Lanois has ‘truly deployed every sonic weapon in his arsenal’, creating the ‘headphone album of the year’ in the process.

Flesh And Machine was initially conceived as an ambient album, building on his work with Brian Eno on classics like Ambient 4: On Land (1982) and Apollo: Atmospheres And Soundtracks (1983). But the album also explores Lanois’ idea of taking the ‘studio as an instrument’ concept to the world of live performance.

Here’s a live studio performance of Opera, from the new album: Continue reading

Four Brian Eno Albums Coming December 1st

four-new-brian-eno-albums

All Saints Records has announced that it will releasing four albums worth of unreleased/rare music from Brian Eno as part of the re-release of four of of Eno’s solo albums:

  • 1992’s Nerve Net
  • 1992’s The Shutov Assembly
  • 1993’s Neroli
  • 1997’s The Drop

Each album release will be expanded with a second album of rarities/unreleased tracks.  Continue reading

‘Lost’ Fripp & Eno Album, Live In Paris 28.05.1975 Now Available

fripp-eno-live-paris

A rare concert by Robert Fripp and Brian Eno – one of a handful by the two – is now available to order.

Live In Paris 28.05.1975 will be released on September 15th and can be obtained from Inner Knot for US customers and Burning Shed for UK and Europe.

Here’s what they have to say about the release:

Hearing the tapes in fully restored audio quality, it’s easy to understand why it attracts such reverence now and perhaps, why the shows attracted such hostility then. No Roxy Music hits, No King Crimson riffs, just a duo sitting in near darkness with a reel to reel tape recorder, improvising over the pre-recorded loops with a filmed background projection.

Replace the reel to reel machine with a couple of laptops/iPads/sequencers and the core of much current live performance from electronica to hip-hop was there some thirty years in advance. At the time, audiences responded to such a glimpse of the future with booing, walkouts and general confusion.

Thanks to the discovery and restoration of the original backing tapes, it was possible to isolate, de-noise and match the live elements from the performance tapes to the studio loops to produce the final recording. Continue reading