KMI Tutorial Explains Google Chrome’s Web MIDI API

With the newest version of Google Chrome, which came out a few weeks ago, the browser has added support for hardware MIDI – meaning that you can now use your MIDI controllers to play web-based music software. Continue reading

Free HTML 5 Drum Machine For Your Web Browser

html-drum-machine

Developer Jamie Thomson let us know about the HTML 5 Drum Machine Emulator – a new browser-based drum machine, described as a ‘the most advanced in-browser drum machine available’.

“I created this app with the intention that producers could compose and download drum patterns in a highly intuitive and accessible way,” says Thomson.  Continue reading

Free NexusUI Turns Your Web Browser Into A Music Controller

free-open-source-javascript-music-controllerNexusUI is a free JavaScript library of audio interface components lets you turn your Web browser into a music controller.

NexusUI is not a ‘canned solution’, but is a set of components that can be used to build custom interfaces.

Because they are built with Javascript, interfaces based on NexusUI can run in a Web browser. And they can be used to integrate directly with the Web Audio API in the browser, or to transmit OSC to apps like Max, SuperCollider or Chuck. Continue reading

BBC Recreates Sounds Of Radiophonic Workshop With HTML Audio

The BBC has published some online demonstrations that recreate the sounds of the BBC Radiophonic Workshop using the Web Audio API:

Explore the BBC sound of the 1960s with our 4 demos of Radiophonic equipment, built with the new Web Audio API standard. Each demo comes with commented code, so you can learn how to build your own audio applications.

The demos include simulations of the Workshop’s gunfire effects, the ‘Wobbulator’, tape loops & a ring modulator.

Continue reading

Can Your Mobile Device Play This? (HTML Audio Test)

Can your mobile device play this?

Alex Gibson’s WAVE-PD1, aka WavePad, is a basic synth toy that sounds a bit like a theremin, built with HTML 5 audio.

WavePad has a simple touchpad UI and generates sound based on the waveform and filter settings that you can select. It can also be affected using delay and feedback settings.

While it’s unsophisticated as a synth, it’s built with HTML and delivered via the Web, so it should theoretically be cross-platform. At this time, only about 25% of the smartphones in use support HTML5 audio.

Does this work with yours?