WebX0X Turns Your Web Browser Into A Drum Machine

webx0x-browser-drum-machine

Irritant Creative’s WebX0X is a free drum synthesizer and sequencer that runs in your web browser.

It’s built using the Web Audio API. Because it’s based on web standards, it works in recent versions of Chrome, Firefox and Safari on desktop and iOS.  All sound generation is performed entirely in the browser without the use of samples. Continue reading

New W3C Music Notation Community Group Makes MusicXML, SMuFL Web Standards

does music notation still matter for electronic musicMakeMusic and Steinberg have announced the creation of the W3C Music Notation Community Group, tasked with maintaining MusicXML and SMuFL (Standard Music Font Layout) specifications as Web standards.

The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) is the international organization that creates and promotes standards for the World Wide Web.  Continue reading

KMI Tutorial Explains Google Chrome’s Web MIDI API

With the newest version of Google Chrome, which came out a few weeks ago, the browser has added support for hardware MIDI – meaning that you can now use your MIDI controllers to play web-based music software. Continue reading

Free HTML 5 Drum Machine For Your Web Browser

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Developer Jamie Thomson let us know about the HTML 5 Drum Machine Emulator – a new browser-based drum machine, described as a ‘the most advanced in-browser drum machine available’.

“I created this app with the intention that producers could compose and download drum patterns in a highly intuitive and accessible way,” says Thomson.  Continue reading

Free NexusUI Turns Your Web Browser Into A Music Controller

free-open-source-javascript-music-controllerNexusUI is a free JavaScript library of audio interface components lets you turn your Web browser into a music controller.

NexusUI is not a ‘canned solution’, but is a set of components that can be used to build custom interfaces.

Because they are built with Javascript, interfaces based on NexusUI can run in a Web browser. And they can be used to integrate directly with the Web Audio API in the browser, or to transmit OSC to apps like Max, SuperCollider or Chuck. Continue reading