PX7 Brings Classic Yamaha DX7 Sound To Propellerhead Reason

Propellerhead has introduced PX7 FM Synthesizer, a new six-operator FM synth in Propellerhead’s Rack Extension format, based on the classic Yamaha DX7.

The PX7 FM Synthesizer is patch-compatible with the classic it’s based on. Patches from the original are included with PX7, and Propellerhead has an online patch converter that takes Yamaha DX7 patches and converts them to PX7 format.

Here are the details:

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New App, iYM2151, ‘The World’s First FM Synthesis Music Workstation’

Detune has released iYM2151, a new iPad music app that they describe as ‘the world’s first FM synthesis music workstation’.

Here’s what they have to say about iYM2151:

YM2151, aka OPM, is a single-chip FM synthesis implementation, an eight-channel four-operator sound chip. it was used in many 80’s arcade games and home computers.

iYM2151 is the The world’s first FM synthesis music workstation app, using YM2151 simulator engine for iApp.

iYM2151 not only tries to recreate the 80’s FM sound, but it also recreates the experience of working with an 80’s FM interface.

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New DIY FM Synthesizer – preenFM

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Reader Xavier Hosxe sends word about a new DIY synth project, preenFM.

preenFM is an open source and open hardware project that lets you build a hardware FM synth module.

Features:

  • 9 different FM algorithms with up to 6 operators
    • Each operator includes a pair of oscillator and ADSR envelope
    • Oscillator : 7 waveforms (4 sin variation + noise + square + sawtooth), linked to keyb freq or fix, fine tune
  • Up to 4 voice polyphony with 3 operators FM algorithm, up to 3 voice polyphony with 4 operators FM algorithm and up to 2 with 6 operators FM algorithm.
  • Glide available when voice set to 1
  • 3 standard LFOs (4 waveforms (saw, ramp, square, random), frequency in Hz, ramp up to 4 seconds, reset on new note).
  • 1 Env type LFO
  • 8 rows modulation matrix – 12 different sources and 24 destinations
  • 4 banks of 128 user presets
  • System exclusive to exchange patches and banks with a computer
  • Midi control : 44 control input/output control changes linked to parameters
  • Nrpn : input/ouput of all paremeters
  • Midi channel selectable : Midi for other channges can be forwarded to plug several PreenFM in serial
  • Large readable 4×20 LCD
  • Friendly surface controle : You always clearly see on the screen what you’re currently editing
  • Sampling rate : 32768 Hz (Makes integer division faster). Pseudo 11 bits.
  • 1024 Hz for LFO and modulation matrix
  • 6th order butterworth analog filter to convert the 1 bit output into a nice waveform
  • Transparent case that allows you to see every day your nice work

preenFM is going to be made available in limited quanities in mid-December. Hosxe says that there will be a batch of 20 kits, priced at 130 euros + shipping for the full kit.

See the preenFM site for details.

The ADDAC102 Voltage Controller FM RADIO For Modular Synthesizers

This is a presentation of the new ADDAC102 Voltage-Controlled FM RADIO – a voltage-controller FM radio for your modular synthesizer.

FM synthesis may never be the same.  Continue reading

Eric Barbour’s Experimental Metasonix Vacuum Tube Synthesizer

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Like it thick and nasty?

This video captures Metasonix’ Eric Barbour, no stranger to the thick and nasty, demonstrating his Experimental Metasonix Console, a vacuum tube synth.

You can get a little insight into the Metasonix mindset from our Eric Barbour interview.

via deengineered:

Don’t expect this to hit the shelves anytime soon, the thyratrons alone cost $20-30 each, and unlike most other Metasonix tubes, are growing scarcer by the year.

The Yamaha DX7 II FM Synthesizer

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This is a demo of the classic Yamaha DX7 II FM Synthesizer.

The Yamaha DX7 was a synthesizer manufactured by the Yamaha Corporation from 1983 to 1986. It was the first commercially successful digital synthesizer, and its sounds can be heard on many recordings from the 1980s.

Three improved “DX7 II” models were released between 1987 and 1989, all of which featured updated internal circuitry and a new style case.

These were:

  • the DX7 IID, which improved sound quality from 12 bit to 16 bit, and allowed bi-timbrality;
  • the DX7 IIFD, which was identical to the DX7 IID except that it also had a floppy disk drive; and
  • the DX7s, which had improved sound quality and the updated case, but otherwise had the same essential functionality of the original DX7.

There was also a TX802 rackmaount version.

DX7 IIs could transmit and receive on any one of 16 MIDI channels at a time.

If you’ve used the Yamaha DX7 II FM Synthesizer, leave a comment with your thoughts/ratings! Continue reading