Sonic Charge Permut8 Sound Mangling

YouTube Preview Image

Sonic Charge has introduced Permut8, a new VST / AudioUnit that lets you modulate, manipulate and mangle your audio in countless ways.

Here’s what Sonic Charge has to say about Permut8:

Permut8 is an effect plug-in that embraces the sounds of primitive signal processing hardware. At its core is a 12-bit digital delay with variable sample rate from 0 to 352 khz. The delay is controlled by a programmable processor that allows you to change and modulate the delay time with various “operators”. The input and output stages offers virtual analog components for saturation, limiting and filtering. The sound of Permut8 is raw and complex but noisy and warm at the same time.

Permut8 is available now, for Mac & Windows, for $66. A trial version is also available.

Sonic Charge Permut8 “Excels In Digital Noises Of All Kinds”

Sonic Charge has announced Permut8, their first new VST / AudioUnit since Bitspeek last year.

Here’s what they have to say about Permut8:

Permut8 is an effect that can take on many forms. It is one of those products that is hard to describe in a couple of sentences. The kind that a marketing department would hate (luckily we have no marketing department at Sonic Charge).

It excels in digital noises of all kinds, but can also sound warm and lush. It can do conventional delay effects and it can create circuit bent mayhem from hell. Perhaps more important than what it does is how it does it.

Permut8 gives you a number of primitive operators that you combine in different ways to manipulate the playback position on a delay-line. This runs on an imaginary vintage digital processor with 12-bit A/D D/A conversion and variable clock frequency from 0 to 352kHz. On top of this you will find a number of “analog” components for filtering, limiting, saturation and more.

Did that sound complicated? Permut8 is complicated, but it is also a product that is designed for experimentation and happy accidents, and boy do they happen often. Bring your crash helmet.

Continue reading

Rack Extensions For Reason – Developers Offer Their Take

YouTube Preview Image

This official video, via PropellerheadSW, features some of the developers working on Rack Extensions for Reason and Reason Essentials offering their take on the new format.

Featured developers include Rob Papen, Magnus Lidström (Sonic Charge), Urs Heckmann (U-he), Dave Spiers (GForce), Kurt Kurasaki (Peff), Angus Hewlett (FXpansion) and others, along with Propellerhead’s Ernst Nathorst-Böös.

Propellerheads Rack Extension Details From A Developer’s Perspective

YouTube Preview Image

The biggest news out of Musikmesse 2012, at least for Propellerhead Reason users, was the announcement of Rack Extensions -a new format that opens up the Reason Rack to third-party developers.

Rack Extensions are full Reason rack citizens, giving users the same experience with third party extensions as with any other Reason device. This includes the ability to load them in Reason’s Combinator, route audio and CV cables on the back, automation of all parameters, copy/paste devices and signal chains, and experimentation with the safety of unlimited undo.

This video, via Sonic State, features Magnus Lidstrom from SonicCharge (makers of Synplant) talking about converting their BitSpeak plug-in to the new format and what Rack Extensions mean for developers.

Rack Extensions will be coming in Reason 6.5, which is expected in Summer 2012.

Sonic Charge µTonic 3.0 – A Virtual Drum Instrument For Windows + Mac

Sonic Charge has released µTonic 3.0, an updated version of its virtual drum machine instrument for Windows and Mac.

It’s the first major update to µTonic in five years.

Long-waiting µTonic users will find more than 20 new features, though, and an updated user interface. It’s free for registered users, too!

Details below.

If you’ve used µTonic, leave a comment and let us know what you think of it! Continue reading

Sonic Charge Intros Bitspeek Vocoder Effect

Sonic Charge has introduced Bitspeek – a real-time pitch-excited linear prediction codec effect.

Linear prediction coding is a voice compression technology that appeared in commercial products in the seventies and was implemented in some well-known speaking toys of the early eighties.

Sonic Charge has applied the technology to create a VST / AU effect plug-in that analyzes audio, extracts a number of parameters (including pitch, volume and formant data) and then resynthesizes the audio using a simple oscillator, noise and filter architecture.

Despite having only a few simple controls, this box can produce a broad range of sounds from cheap speaking toys to high-end vocoder and talkbox effects.

Bitspeek is available for Mac & Windows for $29. See the Sonic Charge site for audio demos and more info.

New Site, Patternarium, Lets You Evolve Beats

YouTube Preview Image

This demo, via Torley, takes at Sonic Charge Patternarium, a new site that lets you help “evolve” beats, by using a social media voting mechanism.

The site creates beats algorithmically and then they “evolve” to survive:

Our servers are regularly spawning new generations of a thousand unique patterns, each one being the cross product of two other patterns picked at random. The higher votes a certain pattern receives, the more likely it is to get picked and bear offspring into the next generation. This means that you may participate and influence the outcome of Patternarium simply by voting.

The beats are designed for uTonic and are public domain. You can download the “evolved” beats and use them with uTonic.

The Best Electronic Music Tech Of 2009

best-electronic-music-gear-2009Mark Mosher at ModulateThis! has posted his thoughts on the best electronic music gear of 2009.

“Despite the economic downturn, 2009 was thankfully a huge year when it came to new technology for electronic music artists,” notes Mosher.

He highlights, among other things:

  • the rise of matrix sequencers and matrix synths;
  • the Percussa AudioCubes;
  • SonicCharge Synplant;
  • JR Hexatone Pro; and
  • Novation AutoMap for the iPhone/iPod touch.

2009 was a surprisingly good year for music technology – if only we could afford some of this cool stuff!

We’ve got our own end-of-the-year lookbacks on the way, but, in the meantime, don’t miss Mosher’s post.