Diego Stocco On Making Music From Breakfast Cereal

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In the last few years, Diego Stocco has established himself as the MacGyver of sound design – able to create interesting sounds and music from just about anything.

He’s set pianos on fire, he’s made music from a bonsai tree, he’s done beat making with the sounds of a dry cleaner and he’s even used a squirrel as a reverb.

For his latest project, Kashi hired him to score a commercial – using breakfast cereal. Continue reading

The Music Of Far Cry Primal

The latest episode of the SoundWorks Collection sound profiles features composer Jason Graves, discussing his unique approach to scoring Far Cry Primal. Continue reading

Sound Design With The Paul Vo Wond

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At the 2015 NAMM Show, inventor Paul Vo (Moog Guitar) introduced the Wond String Exciter, a new device, designed to let you explore new ways of playing string instruments.

Vo’s instruments explore the idea of ‘acoustic synthesis’ – using electronics to control the vibration of physical objects and to shape the harmonics of the resulting sounds.

And, while the Wond is being targeted to guitarists, Vo says that it is the most powerful handheld exciter, sustainer and controller ever made – so it has other interesting applications.

In the following video demo – Experimental Synth’s Chris Stack explores using the Wond for sound design: Continue reading

Diego Stocco Wants You To Use A Squirrel For A Reverb, Intros Rhythmic Convolutions 2 Impulse Responses

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Diego Stocco is one of the most creative sound designers around – whether he is creating sounds for OmniSphere, scoring films, building his own orchestra or finding inspiration in strange places.

Now he wants to teach you how to use a squirrel for a reverb.  Continue reading

An Interview With Sound Designer & Composer John Keston

john-kestonThe latest episode of the Art + Music + Technology podcast features an interview with sound designer, developer and composer John Keston.

Here’s what host Darwin Grosse has to say about the interview:

John Keston came onto my radar in sort of a random way – he sent me a link to some of his music, and I kind of fell in love with it. It was sound designerly, but also musically deep. Then I started digging into his work, and it touched on a lot of my interests.

So wouldn’t you know that, when I interviewed him, I find out that our paths were constructed in similar ways. Musc, tech, art – it boils together to become an interesting – and personal – mix. In John’s case, this was programming, music and gigging, expansion into visual arts and finding a way to bring it all together. Some of his concepts on scores and improvisation are incredibly insightful, and I really appreciated him sharing his background and perspectives.

Continue reading