Tangerine Dream Is Dead; Long Live Tangerine Dream

tangerine-dream-froese-franke-baumannEdgar Froese – the creative soul of the influential electronic group Tangerine Dream for the last 48 years – died in January.

Now Froese’s son, Jerome Froese – who was part of the group for more than 15 years – has announced that Tangerine Dream is dead, too.

In a statement on his Facebook page, Jerome Froese makes clear that his father was the soul of Tangerine Dream, and that the group should not carry on without him: Continue reading

A Farewell To Edgar Froese

Edgar FroeseThe latest episode of the Progtopia podcast is a farewell to Edgar Froese (6 June 1944-20 January 2015).

In this episode, Progtopia host Mark Ashby shares his thoughts on Froese’s passing, plays some highlights from Froese’s career; and talks with electronic musician Ian Boddy and journalists John Diliberto, Anil Prasad, and Cliff Pearson, all of whom had a close connection with Froese and his music.

You can listen to A Farewell To Edgar Froese via the embed below or at the Progtopia site: Continue reading

Tangerine Dream – Montreal 1977

Sunday Synth Jam: In memory of Edgar Froese, who died last week (Jan 20th) at the age of 70, here is a classic live performance by Tangerine Dream.

The recording comes from a concert at Place des Arts (Montreal), on April 09, 1977. It features the seminal Edgar Froese, Chris Franke & Peter Baumann lineup. Continue reading

Skoog 2 – An Accessible Wireless MIDI Controller

The original Skoog is a MIDI controller that looks like a big squishy toy. It was designed to be accessible and bring physical modeling synthesis, sampling and MIDI to users that may not be able to use a standard controller.

Now Skoog Music has announced the Skoog 2.0, above, a new version that’s designed to be more affordable and more powerful. Continue reading

Tangerine Dream – Sorcerer (Soundtrack)

tangerine-dream-sorcerorTangerine Dream has been hugely influential in the world of film soundtracks, and, more recently, in the world of video game soundtracks. The group has scored over 50 films, including indie films, ‘b’ movies and mainstream Hollywood films.

While it was not their first soundtrack, their score for the 1977 William Friedkin flim, Sorceror, kicked off a 15-year period of intense soundtrack work.

The film was a bomb when it was released. It followed Friedkin’s critically acclaimed and wildly successful The Exorcist. Viewers may have expected another supernatural-themed story, based on the film’s title, or may have been put off by the film’s non-English sections.

Since then, though, Sorcerer has gained respect as an intense, existential thriller – and Tangerine Dream’s music has become one of their most well-respected soundtracks.

Continue reading