New Virtual Reality Modular Synthesizer, Synthspace, Coming To Steam In December

Developer Markus Hofer let us know that Synthspace, a new virtual reality modular synthesizer, is coming to Steam in early December 2020. He also shared the official preview video, embedded above.

Synthspace lets you build and play a Eurorack-style modular synthesizer in virtual reality.

“Synthspace is my attempt to capture the physicality of a modular synthesizer, while adding in all sorts of magical bits that are only possible in a virtual world,” notes Hofer. “VR is the exciting part, but I want to create an instrument that is fun and flexible and ready whenever you need it.”

Pricing and Availability

Hofer says that the app will offer “A room full of synths for the price of a nice lunch,” and expects it to be available in early December 2020. You can Wishlist it on Steam now.

20 thoughts on “New Virtual Reality Modular Synthesizer, Synthspace, Coming To Steam In December

  1. Its almost Oculus time so hell yeah!!
    Software is where its best for the modular approach because of patch memory, adding VR might even make it fun to use a software synth for me. Mmm now when do i skip lunch this week?

      1. Is that really true though?
        In reality patch designers also value being able to recover something special and taking parts of it to new sonic places. Sharing those patches adds another layer of enjoyment. Not having to sacrifice the time to rebuild the patch must be worth something.

        I doubt anyone expects this VR experience to be as fully “organic” as hardware. But anyone that has used VCV Rack for any amount of time has to at least respect that virtualized modular (and the inherent stored-preset) is a valid thing.

        1. “In reality patch designers also value being able to recover something special and taking parts of it to new sonic places. Sharing those patches adds another layer of enjoyment. Not having to sacrifice the time to rebuild the patch must be worth something.”

          In reality, I *don’t* value presets on synths, whether hardware or software. (On some types of effects plugins, I feel like a few presets can be useful default starting points.)

          Sound design is part of the composition process. Time spent building a patch is fully worthwhile. To me, auditioning a bunch of factory or third-party presets is mostly wasted time.

          Having a habit of patching from scratch gives you the understanding and experience to be able to recreate common types of sounds fairly quickly. If I want an FM bass patch with a particular flavor, I can build it more quickly on my Eurorack modular than I can find the right preset in a VST plugin.

          I realize presets / patch recall are useful for people who play live, or for composers on a TV series where they do have to go back and keep revisiting the same thing. That’s not my situation.

          1. Or for people who want to save “uncommon” types of sounds. I’ve made sounds on the modular where i regret to this day, that i didn’t make patch notes, because I’ve not been able to recreate them.

          2. Good for you that you find that such an integral part of composing! But don’t make it seem like that’s the world, I doubt you’re even the majority for people composing music at all. Heck, most of my favourite songs of all time have presets in ’em and who the fuck gives a fuck besides elitists like you?

        1. John’s never saved a preset. He also works as a computer programmer. He never saves a program. He writes each program from scratch each time he runs it. Before posting, he wrote an entire operating system and web browser from scratch. As Mr. John points out, true programmers don’t save any of their work … ever. It’s just not done. How do you think Google became such a huge company? From saving programs? Pshaw! Google employs an army that writes the entire Google platform from scratch each and every morning. Same with Apple, and all successful companies.

          1. I do enjoy the “zen garden” approach to euro. I wipe the slate clean every time and have to let go. Which, if I were to truly pick the one thing that holds most good musicians back from continuously making good music, it’s that they can’t just let go of old work, half–baked songs, semi good ideas or starting points that just aren’t going anywhere… a shame, but also a fact of the creative process.

            It’s good practice to work and strengthen the “muscle” used to sever an emotional connection to something that could’ve been good but just has you spinning in circles.

            But yeah, being able to save is something NOBODY should complain about. It should never ever be mentioned as a negative.

        2. Yes, I save lots of presets. The questions is, do I go back and play them?
          On a synth I know well, no I don’t go back and use it, unless it’s part of a composition. If I know it well, I can get whatever sound I like out of it. That’s what knowing you synth is all about.

          That’s my philosophy.

          Rabid Bat – thanks for your characterization. Fact is when I did work, I very much did it that way, because each problem was unique. And synth playing is like that for me. Each session is unique. Take advantage of what you spent your money on. Learn your instrument.

  2. Hmmm…i am not sure if it is fun to tweak those virtual knobs without any physical feedback.
    But it is an interesting concept that might has potential…

  3. am i the only one who is a little skeptical about Eurorack ergonomics with VR controllers? Patching in VR seems like it could have great potential, but I’d rather see a re-imagining of the form factor that plays more to the strengths of virtual space and motion controllers. I get that it makes it look like the racks its trying to emulate, but functionally, why have a 4hp module crammed full of jacks when virtual space is infinite (and controller precision isn’t as good as your manual digits).

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