22 thoughts on “Kurzweil PC3K Introduction At NAMM

  1. Dude! Stop touching your nose!

    It makes you look like a liar or a coke head.

    I have owned the k250, k1000, K2000, K2000V3, and have lusted after the 2500 for a decade, but this guy's demo make me NOT want to buy this keyboard just for the half chance that it might have his mucus all over it.

  2. Dude! Stop touching your nose!

    It makes you look like a liar or a coke head.

    I have owned the k250, k1000, K2000, K2000V3, and have lusted after the 2500 for a decade, but this guy's demo make me NOT want to buy this keyboard just for the half chance that it might have his mucus all over it.

  3. "128 MB" – is this a typo..?! The smallest capacity flash drive or SD card that you can buy these days is 2 GB. What exactly can 126 MB be useful for – 1 very small sample?!
    Am I missing anything here?

  4. Flash memory used in synths and flash memory used for cameras are two different technologies. One is built for capacity and the other for fast parallel read/write access. People are constantly confusing this.

  5. ..and 128 MB is a lot more than you think. This is not a DAW, after all.

    FWIW, I play my live set on my MPC5000 and the 192megs it has gets me through a set without loading except at the start.

  6. What you are missing is that this is 128mb of memory that stays when you turn the power off.

    This is a fantastic convenience for gigging musicians.

  7. You won't even need to ever press load at the beginning of your gig and if there is a momentary loss of power it won't matter. The samples will still be there.

  8. You won't even need to ever press load at the beginning of your gig and if there is a momentary loss of power it won't matter. The samples will still be there.

  9. I've never known anybody with a Kurzweil that didn't love it. They had knobs and switches back when everybody else was doing the Yamaha thing.

  10. Well its hard to comment not knowing the price, but for over 1000 bucks, wouldnt it make more sense to use a soft synth running through a keyboard?

    I just flip out every time I see an uber expensive synth with 128 mb memory . . . could be way more, who knows you might fill that up!

  11. Actually for everything that thing can do even though it's over $1000 you be pretty nit picky passing up on this if you could afford it.

    Let's face it, there's still something to be said for a standalone, no latency, no need for a computer just press keys and get instant reaction synths.

    When you have to plunk down the $$$ for a PC/MAC with enough CPU/RAM & a proper sound card to REALLY power all those awesome software plugins, then actually paying for the soft synths which are usually min. $99 a piece or about $500 or more for something like NI Komplete 6…

    You're looking at spending alot more then even THIS awesome synth is estimated at costing. That's of coarse if you don't already have the computer. An let's be serious about this you had better have some serious computer gear in order to run soft synths live cuz you can't really tell a crowd to stfu you're just having a problem with latency and it'll calm down in a sec… LOL. Not saying it isn't done on the cheap by prolly lots of people but I also believe those people prolly figure out they actually have to shell out serious $$$ for a proper computer setup to run soft synths that could compete with this thing live or even in studio.

    I'm a big believer in soft synth and that's what I primarily use. Hell I JUST bought a MicroKORG XL because I could afford it finally so I totally see your point… Kind of… But come on you have to be serious about the computer side of things when you're thinking about playing with soft synths live. Which to some people makes them think why not just plunk down on a sweetass synth that can do a whole damn lot and not have to worry about taking computer classes to make music?

    Like I said I use soft synths and am a computer programmer and technician so I'm more than at home in that environment. You gotta face facts though that not every musician out there IS like that. Usually quite the oppisite a musician just wants the thing to work and make great sounds and be reliable…

  12. Actually for everything that thing can do even though it's over $1000 you be pretty nit picky passing up on this if you could afford it.

    Let's face it, there's still something to be said for a standalone, no latency, no need for a computer just press keys and get instant reaction synths.

    When you have to plunk down the $$$ for a PC/MAC with enough CPU/RAM & a proper sound card to REALLY power all those awesome software plugins, then actually paying for the soft synths which are usually min. $99 a piece or about $500 or more for something like NI Komplete 6…

    You're looking at spending alot more then even THIS awesome synth is estimated at costing. That's of coarse if you don't already have the computer. An let's be serious about this you had better have some serious computer gear in order to run soft synths live cuz you can't really tell a crowd to stfu you're just having a problem with latency and it'll calm down in a sec… LOL. Not saying it isn't done on the cheap by prolly lots of people but I also believe those people prolly figure out they actually have to shell out serious $$$ for a proper computer setup to run soft synths that could compete with this thing live or even in studio.

    I'm a big believer in soft synth and that's what I primarily use. Hell I JUST bought a MicroKORG XL because I could afford it finally so I totally see your point… Kind of… But come on you have to be serious about the computer side of things when you're thinking about playing with soft synths live. Which to some people makes them think why not just plunk down on a sweetass synth that can do a whole damn lot and not have to worry about taking computer classes to make music?

    Like I said I use soft synths and am a computer programmer and technician so I'm more than at home in that environment. You gotta face facts though that not every musician out there IS like that. Usually quite the oppisite a musician just wants the thing to work and make great sounds and be reliable…

  13. I've never known anybody with a Kurzweil that didn't love it. They had knobs and switches back when everybody else was doing the Yamaha thing.

  14. I've never known anybody with a Kurzweil that didn't love it. They had knobs and switches back when everybody else was doing the Yamaha thing.

  15. I have owned the Kurzweil K1000, K2000, K2vx and now a K2600. I've owned the K2600 for six years and it has been banged up pretty badly but still going strong. The PC3 looked interesting to me but I was disappointed that It could not load samples or K series programs.

    The PC3K changes the whole game. The price is worth it to me knowing that everything I learned on the Kseries as well as most of the sounds I've purchased or programmed can be ported over. Having 88 keys is a relatively small package is a welcome addition.

    I use my K2600 in my jazz performances with the Edwin Daugherty Quartet based in Chicago. We do a mix of bop, Avant Gaurde, electronic and acoustic music. The k2600 provides acoustic and electric pianos, african percussion and more. I use a lot of the tripple modular programs for ethereal sounds. I've had this thing for so long and is still holding it down. I'm still amazed every time I turn it on. The only other keyboard I use is the Waldorf Microwave II XTk which adds a nice contrast to the K.

    The new features, sequencer, and the flash memory are enough reason to set aside some buck for the PC3K.

  16. your comment as a working player should be at the top-these other commentators seem like guys who play in their bedrooms! thank you!

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