Novation Ultranova Synthesizer First Look (AES 2010)

AES 2010: This video, via soundonsoundvideo, takes a look at the Novation Ultranova, a new analog-modeling synthesizer:

The UltraNova is a ‘Nova’ series analogue-modelling synthesizer with a built-in effects processor. It is a single-part synth taking the Supernova II synth engine as a starting point . It now has new features including wavetable synthesis, even more powerful filters, a software editor and a touch-sense performance mode.

The Novation UltraNova will list for $850 and retail closer to $700.

16 thoughts on “Novation Ultranova Synthesizer First Look (AES 2010)

  1. Is this an authentic analogue synth or just another Digital "analogue" synth?

    Ill stick to my VST's. Cheaper, faster, and better fidelity then recording off hardware. I dont know why kids these days waste so much money on synths.

  2. Although I'm also more into soft synths I also like the Novation products myself. The ultra nova managed to take the place of the Roland SH201 on my 'wanted list' due to its flexibility and overall way its setup. In comparison I think touch sensitive dials make a lot more sense than an infrared beam which you can (or cannot) control. And well; a bus powered device? I have to admit being a little scared there; won't this overload my busses? But in the overall; SWEET.

    On the downside I also think Novation is a company which doesn't take its customers very seriously. Go to their website (http://www.novationmusic.com/), pull up the 'stores' menu and then click 'retail stores'. Bzzzt. Error, error, error….

    Now; pull up the menu again and this time click "online stores". Now notice a rather vague webpage which has no info on it? Hit "control a" to select everything and notice a nasty error message popping up right on top ?

    The reason why I come to the conclusion that Novation doesn't take us seriously is because I spotted and reported these issues 2 months ago and as you can see nothing changed in between. They also never got back to me.

    At that time I was checking up on official stores for their launchpad but well.. Not solely due to the way they ignored me (but it had some influence) but in the end I ended up grabbing a Playstation Move duo set instead of the launchpad.

    Nice products, shame about the company (or their website) ?

    Alas; I like this synth.

  3. Sorry for 2 quick comments behind each other, but I was writing when viewing. What a brain dead interviewer!

    Worst review ever.. That Novation guy looks sincere but the interviewer looks like a totally uninterested moron to me. "That's excellent, when is it shipping?" after which the other guy explains the whole deal, including the price tag and expands on how excited he is. Only to be followed by: "So, when will this be shipping and what its going to cost us?".

    Dude, you JUST asked him that already and he MORE than answered you…

    Those guys don't really seem very interested in what they do at all.. Sounds on sounds? I think we'd better ignore them if all they have interviewers like that around.

  4. that 'moron' is the editor of sound on sound, and has also written several acclaimed books on music production (all of which I own) he's just giving a sales guy a platform, which he does with the minimum of interference imho

  5. Asking a question and then completely forgetting you asked that question and then asking the exact same question again is a bit moronic IMHO.

  6. SynthFan

    Sound On Sound is about as respected an audio magazine as any. Editor Paul White is extremely knowledgeable and a good writer – but that doesn't necessarily translate into great onscreen presence.

  7. You must realize that there are more important things than the "fidelity" of your recording, right? I mean, you can record in a clinical, clean sterile environment but if the source of that recording isn't inspiring nor does it have richness of the richness of sound or timbre (like an pure analog synth), what's the use in recording it at such high fidelity? You say VSTs are "cheaper" and "faster" but there's a reason that the bands you enjoy listening to embrace true hardware – it produces sounds better than anything a VST could ever produce (specifically analog gear). Real oscillators and filters vs. code. It's mathematically impossible to code a Pro One or a Minimoog to perfection. You'll always have a cheap "emulation". But you can indeed record that emulation at "high fidelity". Sorry.

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