Spitfire Audio Releases Originals Epic Choir, Featuring The Sound Of A 50 Voice Vocal Ensemble

Spitfire Audio has introduced Originals Epic Choir, a new software synth that features the sound of a 50-piece large-scale ensemble of London’s finest vocalists, recorded in the hallowed (Lyndhurst) Hall at London’s legendary AIR Studios.

Originals Epic Choir features 50 singers, which is the biggest ensemble of voices that we’ve recorded yet,” nootes Spitfire Audio in-house composer Homay Schmitz. “It’s been recorded at AIR Studios’ Lyndhurst Hall, so you get those beautiful acoustics; with it also being a former church, you get the singers in a traditional habitat as well.”

Features:

  • 50-piece ensemble
  • Recorded at Lyndhurst Hall, AIR Studios — home of blockbuster scores
  • Three bespoke signals (Close, Tree, Ethereal)
  • Split into two sections — Sopranos & Altos / Tenors & Bass — both sections offering identical articulations
  • Classic shorts and longs, as well as ‘episodic’ vowel blending textures and short staccato syllables, alternating between vowel sounds

Presets:

  • Sopranos & Altos: Long Ahh — A long sustained note, sung on the vowel sound “ahh”
  • Sopranos & Altos: Long Mmm — A long sustained note, hummed on the consonant “mmm”
  • Sopranos & Altos: Episodic Combo 1 — A long episodically changing sustained note, blending between a combination of different vowel sounds, for a textural and shifting sound
  • Sopranos & Altos: Episodic Combo 2 — A long episodically changing sustained note, blending between a combination of different vowel sounds, for a textural and shifting sound
  • Sopranos & Altos: Short Staccato Syllables — A short, sharp sound, sung on one of up to seven different syllabic sounds
  • Sopranos & Altos: Short Staccato Syllables (keyswitch) — A short, sharp sound, sung on one of up to seven different syllabic sounds, with keyswitch functionality to change between specific syllables
  • Tenors & Basses: Long Ahh — A long sustained note, sung on the vowel sound “ahh”
  • Tenors & Basses: Long Mmm — A long sustained note, hummed on the consonant “mmm”
  • Tenors & Basses: Episodic Combo 1 — A long episodically changing sustained note, blending between a combination of different vowel sounds, for a textural and shifting sound
  • Tenors & Basses: Episodic Combo 2 — A long episodically changing sustained note, blending between a combination of different vowel sounds, for a textural and shifting sound
  • Tenors & Basses: Short Staccato Syllables — A short, sharp sound, sung on one of up to seven different syllabic sounds
  • Tenors & Basses: Short Staccato Syllables (keyswitch) — A short, sharp sound, sung on one of up to seven different syllabic sounds, with keyswitch functionality to change between specific syllables

Controls:

  • Reverb — A realistic Hall-style impulse response
  • Release — A release trigger which only applies to long patches
  • Tightness — This cuts further into the note to make it tighter and only applies to short patches

Signals:

  • Close – Valve spot mics summed together for a direct and upfront image of the string ensemble.
  • Tree – A decca tree microphone array, giving a spacious and enveloping sound.
  • Ethereal – A treated signal (saturation, reverb, EQ) which adds texture, brightness and width to the vocals, while retaining an organic feel

Pricing and Availability:

Originals Epic Choir is available now as an AAX-, AU-, VST2-, and VST3-compatible plug-in, supporting Native Instruments’ NKS (NATIVE KONTROL STANDARD) for Mac (OS X 10.13 – macOS 12) and Windows (7, 8, 10, and II — latest Service Pack) priced at £29.00 GBP (inc. VAT)/$29.00 USD/€29.00 EUR (inc. VAT).

11 thoughts on “Spitfire Audio Releases Originals Epic Choir, Featuring The Sound Of A 50 Voice Vocal Ensemble

  1. I don’t fully get how it’s possible to produce such a library with so many people involved and then sling it for only $30. fifty people singing is nothing to sneeze at!

    1. An older library or recording session rebranded as an “original,” cleaned up and put in their new sample player.

      1. This content isn’t in any of their existing libraries. It may be an “older” recording session, but that’s irrelevant.

  2. 30 bucks?!! Excellent. Especially like that they included a reverb so you can quickly try these out in a concert space. My evening promises to be ethereal. Ahhhhh…. Mmmmmmmm…. Ohhhhhhhh…. Eeeeee…… Uhhhoohhhhhhhhh!!!

  3. at 14:38 “…it’s also the only form of making music where you don’t need any equipment or tools.”
    Says the young artist with the studio full of gear. (Don’t get me wrong, she’s great. And I’m buying the instrument.)

    1. So what?
      I often make a peanut butter sandwich in my kitchen which also has an induction furnace and a microwave.

      And I’m buying too =)

  4. Spitfire has become my go-to for the high quality, but also THIS, from the website:

    “… whenever you invest in a Spitfire Audio library, every musician who played on that library receives a royalty payment. This includes many of our synthesised and textural libraries, which are often based on acoustic recordings. We also pay royalties to our collaborators, such as the BBC Symphony Orchestra and Ólafur Arnalds.”

    That’s the kind of practice I prefer: one that gives the musicians a proper cut. In one small way or another, we get to support our own community. A+++.

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