New Windows Synth VST – Diversion

Diversion VST synthesizer for Windows

Developer Dmitry Sches has released Diversion, a new software synth for Windows.

Features:

  • Sound generation – 4 oscillators with a wide range of different waveforms with a near to zero level of aliasing. Oscillators generate sounds in real-time with algorithms for optimal sound quality at high frequencies. All waveforms have two independent parameters X and Y allowing you to adjust the timbre. Includes FM, RM, wave shaping and filtering.
  • Bus processors – Two bus processors each featuring a stereo multi-filter, distortion and LO-FI section.
  • Filter modes:
    • 24db Lowpass, Highpass and Bandpass
    • 12db Lowpass, Highpass and Bandpass
    • Acid Lowpass and Bandpass
    • 48db Bandpass
    • Ring Lowpass
    • Formant
    • 2, 4 and 8 pole Alpass
    • Notch, Peak, Lowshelf, Highshelf, 6db Lowpass
    • Comb+, Comb-, Bell Comb
  • Effects – Two flexible FX lines, separate processing of each bus processor’s output. Up to 8 effect instances can be stacked in one FX line.
  • Oversampling – up to 8X oversampling within a whole processing path, excluding FX section. Models of all processing modules in Diversion are designed using at least 2X oversampling.
  • Modulation – Many parameters can be modulated by 4 LFOs, 4 ADSR Envelopes, 4 MSEGs and one XY-controller, called Master Morph. Automation and MIDI controllers are supported.
  • Arpeggiator and Trance Gate – 32-step Arpeggiator / Sequencer and a 16-step Trance Gate module.

Diversion is available now for Windows for US $150. A Mac version is in development. Demo version available.

via rekkerd

27 thoughts on “New Windows Synth VST – Diversion

  1. I'm very under-impressed. For a going rate of $200 this critter is directly competing with NI's Absynth 5 which is also going at that price range. And honestly; you'll have to do a LOT better IMO to reach those heights.

    Now, before I continue do not take this the wrong way. I'm not dissing the product; when solely looking at the synth itself its pretty decent. 4 oscs, some basic routing capabilities (even a modulation matrix) lfo's, etc. The usual.

    My main gripe with this critter is that it claims to high for high quality yet cannot produce. For example; they claim a "near to zero level of aliasing". Now, that's fun you guys but you /do/ realize that all the anti-aliasing 'filtering' is having its effects on the waveforms your synths produce ? When I pull up my M4LScope in Live and check the default sawtooth waveform this critter produces I see some very heave wobbles at the bottom of the waveform; caused by anti-aliasing.

    If you now wonder wth I'm talking about then check this blog post in which I show several screenshots of this issue:
    http://blog.synthfan.info/2011/04/18/daw-expansio

    Pay esp. attention to the Operator screenshot at the upper right and compare it with the screenshot in the "test rack" in the middle.

    You may have guessed by now; all the soft synths I hold in high esteem (Operator, Absynth 5) also support alias protection yet can ALSO turn the whole kaboodle off. Resulting in a loss of wobble, which can be very important (IMO anyway) if you want to be sure of a clean sound signal. Anti-aliasing affects the sound waves, Diversion even does so quite heavily.

    Needless to say; Diversion can't turn this stuff off.

    Then there's the routing aspect. its not bad but doesn't even come close to the easily picked up scheme which Absynth 5 uses. By trying to cram the whole interface into one big (huge) window you're easily losing focus or overview here.

    What I also don't like is that there are certain filters which you simply cannot turn off what so ever. Oversampling, treble… I want a clear sound; I don't need treble, no matter how soft it is!

    Speaking of which.. The sound itself is decent but annoying too. What I esp. don't like is that with the oscs. octave set to 0 its still 1 octave /above/ all the other synths I have. Trying to use detune results in plain annoyance because I have to move my mouse upwards. But since the vst fills up most of my screen (I don't do high graphics on my synth box; I preserve as much resources for my synth as I can) there's not much room left to do so.

    And then I realized that this vst doesn't even support entering values manually using your keyboard. That is also when I removed the demo and decided to forget all about it and write this up.

    Now, I know this is a cynical review but don't get me wrong. In the overall Diversion isn't a bad vst. It does what it does and it can produce nice sounds. The main problem is that its absolutely /not/ worth $200. For that amount of money you can pick up Absynth 5 and when comparing features and sounds of those two I cannot conclude otherwise than that Absynth is miles ahead.

    And yes; I know its a "$50 bonus period". Still, my advice would be to save up another $50 and get Absynth 5 instead.

  2. I'm very under-impressed. For a going rate of $200 this critter is directly competing with NI's Absynth 5 which is also going at that price range. And honestly; you'll have to do a LOT better IMO to reach those heights.

    Now, before I continue do not take this the wrong way. I'm not dissing the product; when solely looking at the synth itself its pretty decent. 4 oscs, some basic routing capabilities (even a modulation matrix) lfo's, etc. The usual.

    My main gripe with this critter is that it claims to high for high quality yet cannot produce. For example; they claim a "near to zero level of aliasing". Now, that's fun you guys but you /do/ realize that all the anti-aliasing 'filtering' is having its effects on the waveforms your synths produce ? When I pull up my M4LScope in Live and check the default sawtooth waveform this critter produces I see some very heave wobbles at the bottom of the waveform; caused by anti-aliasing.

    If you now wonder wth I'm talking about then check this blog post in which I show several screenshots of this issue:
    http://blog.synthfan.info/2011/04/18/daw-expansio

    Pay esp. attention to the Operator screenshot at the upper right and compare it with the screenshot in the "test rack" in the middle.

    You may have guessed by now; all the soft synths I hold in high esteem (Operator, Absynth 5) also support alias protection yet can ALSO turn the whole kaboodle off. Resulting in a loss of wobble, which can be very important (IMO anyway) if you want to be sure of a clean sound signal. Anti-aliasing affects the sound waves, Diversion even does so quite heavily.

    Needless to say; Diversion can't turn this stuff off.

    Then there's the routing aspect. its not bad but doesn't even come close to the easily picked up scheme which Absynth 5 uses. By trying to cram the whole interface into one big (huge) window you're easily losing focus or overview here.

    What I also don't like is that there are certain filters which you simply cannot turn off what so ever. Oversampling, treble… I want a clear sound; I don't need treble, no matter how soft it is!

    Speaking of which.. The sound itself is decent but annoying too. What I esp. don't like is that with the oscs. octave set to 0 its still 1 octave /above/ all the other synths I have. Trying to use detune results in plain annoyance because I have to move my mouse upwards. But since the vst fills up most of my screen (I don't do high graphics on my synth box; I preserve as much resources for my synth as I can) there's not much room left to do so.

    And then I realized that this vst doesn't even support entering values manually using your keyboard. That is also when I removed the demo and decided to forget all about it and write this up.

    Now, I know this is a cynical review but don't get me wrong. In the overall Diversion isn't a bad vst. It does what it does and it can produce nice sounds. The main problem is that its absolutely /not/ worth $200. For that amount of money you can pick up Absynth 5 and when comparing features and sounds of those two I cannot conclude otherwise than that Absynth is miles ahead.

    And yes; I know its a "$50 bonus period". Still, my advice would be to save up another $50 and get Absynth 5 instead.

  3. I'm very under-impressed. For a going rate of $200 this critter is directly competing with NI's Absynth 5 which is also going at that price range. And honestly; you'll have to do a LOT better IMO to reach those heights.

    Now, before I continue do not take this the wrong way. I'm not dissing the product; when solely looking at the synth itself its pretty decent. 4 oscs, some basic routing capabilities (even a modulation matrix) lfo's, etc. The usual.

    My main gripe with this critter is that it claims to high for high quality yet cannot produce. For example; they claim a "near to zero level of aliasing". Now, that's fun you guys but you /do/ realize that all the anti-aliasing 'filtering' is having its effects on the waveforms your synths produce ? When I pull up my M4LScope in Live and check the default sawtooth waveform this critter produces I see some very heave wobbles at the bottom of the waveform; caused by anti-aliasing.

    If you now wonder wth I'm talking about then check this blog post in which I show several screenshots of this issue:
    http://blog.synthfan.info/2011/04/18/daw-expansio

    Pay esp. attention to the Operator screenshot at the upper right and compare it with the screenshot in the "test rack" in the middle.

    You may have guessed by now; all the soft synths I hold in high esteem (Operator, Absynth 5) also support alias protection yet can ALSO turn the whole kaboodle off. Resulting in a loss of wobble, which can be very important (IMO anyway) if you want to be sure of a clean sound signal. Anti-aliasing affects the sound waves, Diversion even does so quite heavily.

    Needless to say; Diversion can't turn this stuff off.

    Then there's the routing aspect. its not bad but doesn't even come close to the easily picked up scheme which Absynth 5 uses. By trying to cram the whole interface into one big (huge) window you're easily losing focus or overview here.

    What I also don't like is that there are certain filters which you simply cannot turn off what so ever. Oversampling, treble… I want a clear sound; I don't need treble, no matter how soft it is!

    Speaking of which.. The sound itself is decent but annoying too. What I esp. don't like is that with the oscs. octave set to 0 its still 1 octave /above/ all the other synths I have. Trying to use detune results in plain annoyance because I have to move my mouse upwards. But since the vst fills up most of my screen (I don't do high graphics on my synth box; I preserve as much resources for my synth as I can) there's not much room left to do so.

    And then I realized that this vst doesn't even support entering values manually using your keyboard. That is also when I removed the demo and decided to forget all about it and write this up.

    Now, I know this is a cynical review but don't get me wrong. In the overall Diversion isn't a bad vst. It does what it does and it can produce nice sounds. The main problem is that its absolutely /not/ worth $200. For that amount of money you can pick up Absynth 5 and when comparing features and sounds of those two I cannot conclude otherwise than that Absynth is miles ahead.

    And yes; I know its a "$50 bonus period". Still, my advice would be to save up another $50 and get Absynth 5 instead.

  4. I'm very under-impressed. For a going rate of $200 this critter is directly competing with NI's Absynth 5 which is also going at that price range. And honestly; you'll have to do a LOT better IMO to reach those heights.

    Now, before I continue do not take this the wrong way. I'm not dissing the product; when solely looking at the synth itself its pretty decent. 4 oscs, some basic routing capabilities (even a modulation matrix) lfo's, etc. The usual.

    My main gripe with this critter is that it claims to high for high quality yet cannot produce. For example; they claim a "near to zero level of aliasing". Now, that's fun you guys but you /do/ realize that all the anti-aliasing 'filtering' is having its effects on the waveforms your synths produce ? When I pull up my M4LScope in Live and check the default sawtooth waveform this critter produces I see some very heave wobbles at the bottom of the waveform; caused by anti-aliasing.

    If you now wonder wth I'm talking about then check this blog post in which I show several screenshots of this issue:
    http://blog.synthfan.info/2011/04/18/daw-expansio

    Pay esp. attention to the Operator screenshot at the upper right and compare it with the screenshot in the "test rack" in the middle.

    You may have guessed by now; all the soft synths I hold in high esteem (Operator, Absynth 5) also support alias protection yet can ALSO turn the whole kaboodle off. Resulting in a loss of wobble, which can be very important (IMO anyway) if you want to be sure of a clean sound signal. Anti-aliasing affects the sound waves, Diversion even does so quite heavily.

    Needless to say; Diversion can't turn this stuff off.

    Then there's the routing aspect. its not bad but doesn't even come close to the easily picked up scheme which Absynth 5 uses. By trying to cram the whole interface into one big (huge) window you're easily losing focus or overview here.

    What I also don't like is that there are certain filters which you simply cannot turn off what so ever. Oversampling, treble… I want a clear sound; I don't need treble, no matter how soft it is!

    Speaking of which.. The sound itself is decent but annoying too. What I esp. don't like is that with the oscs. octave set to 0 its still 1 octave /above/ all the other synths I have. Trying to use detune results in plain annoyance because I have to move my mouse upwards. But since the vst fills up most of my screen (I don't do high graphics on my synth box; I preserve as much resources for my synth as I can) there's not much room left to do so.

    And then I realized that this vst doesn't even support entering values manually using your keyboard. That is also when I removed the demo and decided to forget all about it and write this up.

    Now, I know this is a cynical review but don't get me wrong. In the overall Diversion isn't a bad vst. It does what it does and it can produce nice sounds. The main problem is that its absolutely /not/ worth $200. For that amount of money you can pick up Absynth 5 and when comparing features and sounds of those two I cannot conclude otherwise than that Absynth is miles ahead.

    And yes; I know its a "$50 bonus period". Still, my advice would be to save up another $50 and get Absynth 5 instead.

  5. I'm very under-impressed. For a going rate of $200 this critter is directly competing with NI's Absynth 5 which is also going at that price range. And honestly; you'll have to do a LOT better IMO to reach those heights.

    Now, before I continue do not take this the wrong way. I'm not dissing the product; when solely looking at the synth itself its pretty decent. 4 oscs, some basic routing capabilities (even a modulation matrix) lfo's, etc. The usual.

    My main gripe with this critter is that it claims to high for high quality yet cannot produce. For example; they claim a "near to zero level of aliasing". Now, that's fun you guys but you /do/ realize that all the anti-aliasing 'filtering' is having its effects on the waveforms your synths produce ? When I pull up my M4LScope in Live and check the default sawtooth waveform this critter produces I see some very heave wobbles at the bottom of the waveform; caused by anti-aliasing.

    If you now wonder wth I'm talking about then check this blog post in which I show several screenshots of this issue:
    http://blog.synthfan.info/2011/04/18/daw-expansio

    Pay esp. attention to the Operator screenshot at the upper right and compare it with the screenshot in the "test rack" in the middle.

    You may have guessed by now; all the soft synths I hold in high esteem (Operator, Absynth 5) also support alias protection yet can ALSO turn the whole kaboodle off. Resulting in a loss of wobble, which can be very important (IMO anyway) if you want to be sure of a clean sound signal. Anti-aliasing affects the sound waves, Diversion even does so quite heavily.

    Needless to say; Diversion can't turn this stuff off.

    Then there's the routing aspect. its not bad but doesn't even come close to the easily picked up scheme which Absynth 5 uses. By trying to cram the whole interface into one big (huge) window you're easily losing focus or overview here.

    What I also don't like is that there are certain filters which you simply cannot turn off what so ever. Oversampling, treble… I want a clear sound; I don't need treble, no matter how soft it is!

    Speaking of which.. The sound itself is decent but annoying too. What I esp. don't like is that with the oscs. octave set to 0 its still 1 octave /above/ all the other synths I have. Trying to use detune results in plain annoyance because I have to move my mouse upwards. But since the vst fills up most of my screen (I don't do high graphics on my synth box; I preserve as much resources for my synth as I can) there's not much room left to do so.

    And then I realized that this vst doesn't even support entering values manually using your keyboard. That is also when I removed the demo and decided to forget all about it and write this up.

    Now, I know this is a cynical review but don't get me wrong. In the overall Diversion isn't a bad vst. It does what it does and it can produce nice sounds. The main problem is that its absolutely /not/ worth $200. For that amount of money you can pick up Absynth 5 and when comparing features and sounds of those two I cannot conclude otherwise than that Absynth is miles ahead.

    And yes; I know its a "$50 bonus period". Still, my advice would be to save up another $50 and get Absynth 5 instead.

  6. I'm very under-impressed. For a going rate of $200 this critter is directly competing with NI's Absynth 5 which is also going at that price range. And honestly; you'll have to do a LOT better IMO to reach those heights.

    Now, before I continue do not take this the wrong way. I'm not dissing the product; when solely looking at the synth itself its pretty decent. 4 oscs, some basic routing capabilities (even a modulation matrix) lfo's, etc. The usual.

    My main gripe with this critter is that it claims to high for high quality yet cannot produce. For example; they claim a "near to zero level of aliasing". Now, that's fun you guys but you /do/ realize that all the anti-aliasing 'filtering' is having its effects on the waveforms your synths produce ? When I pull up my M4LScope in Live and check the default sawtooth waveform this critter produces I see some very heave wobbles at the bottom of the waveform; caused by anti-aliasing.

    If you now wonder wth I'm talking about then check this blog post in which I show several screenshots of this issue:
    http://blog.synthfan.info/2011/04/18/daw-expansio

    Pay esp. attention to the Operator screenshot at the upper right and compare it with the screenshot in the "test rack" in the middle.

    You may have guessed by now; all the soft synths I hold in high esteem (Operator, Absynth 5) also support alias protection yet can ALSO turn the whole kaboodle off. Resulting in a loss of wobble, which can be very important (IMO anyway) if you want to be sure of a clean sound signal. Anti-aliasing affects the sound waves, Diversion even does so quite heavily.

    Needless to say; Diversion can't turn this stuff off.

    Then there's the routing aspect. its not bad but doesn't even come close to the easily picked up scheme which Absynth 5 uses. By trying to cram the whole interface into one big (huge) window you're easily losing focus or overview here.

    What I also don't like is that there are certain filters which you simply cannot turn off what so ever. Oversampling, treble… I want a clear sound; I don't need treble, no matter how soft it is!

    Speaking of which.. The sound itself is decent but annoying too. What I esp. don't like is that with the oscs. octave set to 0 its still 1 octave /above/ all the other synths I have. Trying to use detune results in plain annoyance because I have to move my mouse upwards. But since the vst fills up most of my screen (I don't do high graphics on my synth box; I preserve as much resources for my synth as I can) there's not much room left to do so.

    And then I realized that this vst doesn't even support entering values manually using your keyboard. That is also when I removed the demo and decided to forget all about it and write this up.

    Now, I know this is a cynical review but don't get me wrong. In the overall Diversion isn't a bad vst. It does what it does and it can produce nice sounds. The main problem is that its absolutely /not/ worth $200. For that amount of money you can pick up Absynth 5 and when comparing features and sounds of those two I cannot conclude otherwise than that Absynth is miles ahead.

    And yes; I know its a "$50 bonus period". Still, my advice would be to save up another $50 and get Absynth 5 instead.

  7. I'm very under-impressed. For a going rate of $200 this critter is directly competing with NI's Absynth 5 which is also going at that price range. And honestly; you'll have to do a LOT better IMO to reach those heights.

    Now, before I continue do not take this the wrong way. I'm not dissing the product; when solely looking at the synth itself its pretty decent. 4 oscs, some basic routing capabilities (even a modulation matrix) lfo's, etc. The usual.

    My main gripe with this critter is that it claims to high for high quality yet cannot produce. For example; they claim a "near to zero level of aliasing". Now, that's fun you guys but you /do/ realize that all the anti-aliasing 'filtering' is having its effects on the waveforms your synths produce ? When I pull up my M4LScope in Live and check the default sawtooth waveform this critter produces I see some very heave wobbles at the bottom of the waveform; caused by anti-aliasing.

    If you now wonder wth I'm talking about then check this blog post in which I show several screenshots of this issue:
    http://blog.synthfan.info/2011/04/18/daw-expansio

    Pay esp. attention to the Operator screenshot at the upper right and compare it with the screenshot in the "test rack" in the middle.

    You may have guessed by now; all the soft synths I hold in high esteem (Operator, Absynth 5) also support alias protection yet can ALSO turn the whole kaboodle off. Resulting in a loss of wobble, which can be very important (IMO anyway) if you want to be sure of a clean sound signal. Anti-aliasing affects the sound waves, Diversion even does so quite heavily.

    Needless to say; Diversion can't turn this stuff off.

    Then there's the routing aspect. its not bad but doesn't even come close to the easily picked up scheme which Absynth 5 uses. By trying to cram the whole interface into one big (huge) window you're easily losing focus or overview here.

    What I also don't like is that there are certain filters which you simply cannot turn off what so ever. Oversampling, treble… I want a clear sound; I don't need treble, no matter how soft it is!

    Speaking of which.. The sound itself is decent but annoying too. What I esp. don't like is that with the oscs. octave set to 0 its still 1 octave /above/ all the other synths I have. Trying to use detune results in plain annoyance because I have to move my mouse upwards. But since the vst fills up most of my screen (I don't do high graphics on my synth box; I preserve as much resources for my synth as I can) there's not much room left to do so.

    And then I realized that this vst doesn't even support entering values manually using your keyboard. That is also when I removed the demo and decided to forget all about it and write this up.

    Now, I know this is a cynical review but don't get me wrong. In the overall Diversion isn't a bad vst. It does what it does and it can produce nice sounds. The main problem is that its absolutely /not/ worth $200. For that amount of money you can pick up Absynth 5 and when comparing features and sounds of those two I cannot conclude otherwise than that Absynth is miles ahead.

    And yes; I know its a "$50 bonus period". Still, my advice would be to save up another $50 and get Absynth 5 instead.

  8. I'm very under-impressed. For a going rate of $200 this critter is directly competing with NI's Absynth 5 which is also going at that price range. And honestly; you'll have to do a LOT better IMO to reach those heights.

    Now, before I continue do not take this the wrong way. I'm not dissing the product; when solely looking at the synth itself its pretty decent. 4 oscs, some basic routing capabilities (even a modulation matrix) lfo's, etc. The usual.

    My main gripe with this critter is that it claims to high for high quality yet cannot produce. For example; they claim a "near to zero level of aliasing". Now, that's fun you guys but you /do/ realize that all the anti-aliasing 'filtering' is having its effects on the waveforms your synths produce ? When I pull up my M4LScope in Live and check the default sawtooth waveform this critter produces I see some very heave wobbles at the bottom of the waveform; caused by anti-aliasing.

    If you now wonder wth I'm talking about then check this blog post in which I show several screenshots of this issue:
    http://blog.synthfan.info/2011/04/18/daw-expansio

    Pay esp. attention to the Operator screenshot at the upper right and compare it with the screenshot in the "test rack" in the middle.

    You may have guessed by now; all the soft synths I hold in high esteem (Operator, Absynth 5) also support alias protection yet can ALSO turn the whole kaboodle off. Resulting in a loss of wobble, which can be very important (IMO anyway) if you want to be sure of a clean sound signal. Anti-aliasing affects the sound waves, Diversion even does so quite heavily.

    Needless to say; Diversion can't turn this stuff off.

    Then there's the routing aspect. its not bad but doesn't even come close to the easily picked up scheme which Absynth 5 uses. By trying to cram the whole interface into one big (huge) window you're easily losing focus or overview here.

    What I also don't like is that there are certain filters which you simply cannot turn off what so ever. Oversampling, treble… I want a clear sound; I don't need treble, no matter how soft it is!

    Speaking of which.. The sound itself is decent but annoying too. What I esp. don't like is that with the oscs. octave set to 0 its still 1 octave /above/ all the other synths I have. Trying to use detune results in plain annoyance because I have to move my mouse upwards. But since the vst fills up most of my screen (I don't do high graphics on my synth box; I preserve as much resources for my synth as I can) there's not much room left to do so.

    And then I realized that this vst doesn't even support entering values manually using your keyboard. That is also when I removed the demo and decided to forget all about it and write this up.

    Now, I know this is a cynical review but don't get me wrong. In the overall Diversion isn't a bad vst. It does what it does and it can produce nice sounds. The main problem is that its absolutely /not/ worth $200. For that amount of money you can pick up Absynth 5 and when comparing features and sounds of those two I cannot conclude otherwise than that Absynth is miles ahead.

    And yes; I know its a "$50 bonus period". Still, my advice would be to save up another $50 and get Absynth 5 instead.

  9. I'm very under-impressed. For a going rate of $200 this critter is directly competing with NI's Absynth 5 which is also going at that price range. And honestly; you'll have to do a LOT better IMO to reach those heights.

    Now, before I continue do not take this the wrong way. I'm not dissing the product; when solely looking at the synth itself its pretty decent. 4 oscs, some basic routing capabilities (even a modulation matrix) lfo's, etc. The usual.

    My main gripe with this critter is that it claims to high for high quality yet cannot produce. For example; they claim a "near to zero level of aliasing". Now, that's fun you guys but you /do/ realize that all the anti-aliasing 'filtering' is having its effects on the waveforms your synths produce ? When I pull up my M4LScope in Live and check the default sawtooth waveform this critter produces I see some very heave wobbles at the bottom of the waveform; caused by anti-aliasing.

    If you now wonder wth I'm talking about then check this blog post in which I show several screenshots of this issue:
    http://blog.synthfan.info/2011/04/18/daw-expansio

    Pay esp. attention to the Operator screenshot at the upper right and compare it with the screenshot in the "test rack" in the middle.

    You may have guessed by now; all the soft synths I hold in high esteem (Operator, Absynth 5) also support alias protection yet can ALSO turn the whole kaboodle off. Resulting in a loss of wobble, which can be very important (IMO anyway) if you want to be sure of a clean sound signal. Anti-aliasing affects the sound waves, Diversion even does so quite heavily.

    Needless to say; Diversion can't turn this stuff off.

    Then there's the routing aspect. its not bad but doesn't even come close to the easily picked up scheme which Absynth 5 uses. By trying to cram the whole interface into one big (huge) window you're easily losing focus or overview here.

    What I also don't like is that there are certain filters which you simply cannot turn off what so ever. Oversampling, treble… I want a clear sound; I don't need treble, no matter how soft it is!

    Speaking of which.. The sound itself is decent but annoying too. What I esp. don't like is that with the oscs. octave set to 0 its still 1 octave /above/ all the other synths I have. Trying to use detune results in plain annoyance because I have to move my mouse upwards. But since the vst fills up most of my screen (I don't do high graphics on my synth box; I preserve as much resources for my synth as I can) there's not much room left to do so.

    And then I realized that this vst doesn't even support entering values manually using your keyboard. That is also when I removed the demo and decided to forget all about it and write this up.

    Now, I know this is a cynical review but don't get me wrong. In the overall Diversion isn't a bad vst. It does what it does and it can produce nice sounds. The main problem is that its absolutely /not/ worth $200. For that amount of money you can pick up Absynth 5 and when comparing features and sounds of those two I cannot conclude otherwise than that Absynth is miles ahead.

    And yes; I know its a "$50 bonus period". Still, my advice would be to save up another $50 and get Absynth 5 instead.

  10. I'm very under-impressed. For a going rate of $200 this critter is directly competing with NI's Absynth 5 which is also going at that price range. And honestly; you'll have to do a LOT better IMO to reach those heights.

    Now, before I continue do not take this the wrong way. I'm not dissing the product; when solely looking at the synth itself its pretty decent. 4 oscs, some basic routing capabilities (even a modulation matrix) lfo's, etc. The usual.

    My main gripe with this critter is that it claims to high for high quality yet cannot produce. For example; they claim a "near to zero level of aliasing". Now, that's fun you guys but you /do/ realize that all the anti-aliasing 'filtering' is having its effects on the waveforms your synths produce ? When I pull up my M4LScope in Live and check the default sawtooth waveform this critter produces I see some very heave wobbles at the bottom of the waveform; caused by anti-aliasing.

    If you now wonder wth I'm talking about then check this blog post in which I show several screenshots of this issue:
    http://blog.synthfan.info/2011/04/18/daw-expansio

    Pay esp. attention to the Operator screenshot at the upper right and compare it with the screenshot in the "test rack" in the middle.

    You may have guessed by now; all the soft synths I hold in high esteem (Operator, Absynth 5) also support alias protection yet can ALSO turn the whole kaboodle off. Resulting in a loss of wobble, which can be very important (IMO anyway) if you want to be sure of a clean sound signal. Anti-aliasing affects the sound waves, Diversion even does so quite heavily.

    Needless to say; Diversion can't turn this stuff off.

    Then there's the routing aspect. its not bad but doesn't even come close to the easily picked up scheme which Absynth 5 uses. By trying to cram the whole interface into one big (huge) window you're easily losing focus or overview here.

    What I also don't like is that there are certain filters which you simply cannot turn off what so ever. Oversampling, treble… I want a clear sound; I don't need treble, no matter how soft it is!

    Speaking of which.. The sound itself is decent but annoying too. What I esp. don't like is that with the oscs. octave set to 0 its still 1 octave /above/ all the other synths I have. Trying to use detune results in plain annoyance because I have to move my mouse upwards. But since the vst fills up most of my screen (I don't do high graphics on my synth box; I preserve as much resources for my synth as I can) there's not much room left to do so.

    And then I realized that this vst doesn't even support entering values manually using your keyboard. That is also when I removed the demo and decided to forget all about it and write this up.

    Now, I know this is a cynical review but don't get me wrong. In the overall Diversion isn't a bad vst. It does what it does and it can produce nice sounds. The main problem is that its absolutely /not/ worth $200. For that amount of money you can pick up Absynth 5 and when comparing features and sounds of those two I cannot conclude otherwise than that Absynth is miles ahead.

    And yes; I know its a "$50 bonus period". Still, my advice would be to save up another $50 and get Absynth 5 instead.

  11. I'm very under-impressed. For a going rate of $200 this critter is directly competing with NI's Absynth 5 which is also going at that price range. And honestly; you'll have to do a LOT better IMO to reach those heights.

    Now, before I continue do not take this the wrong way. I'm not dissing the product; when solely looking at the synth itself its pretty decent. 4 oscs, some basic routing capabilities (even a modulation matrix) lfo's, etc. The usual.

    My main gripe with this critter is that it claims to high for high quality yet cannot produce. For example; they claim a "near to zero level of aliasing". Now, that's fun you guys but you /do/ realize that all the anti-aliasing 'filtering' is having its effects on the waveforms your synths produce ? When I pull up my M4LScope in Live and check the default sawtooth waveform this critter produces I see some very heave wobbles at the bottom of the waveform; caused by anti-aliasing.

    If you now wonder wth I'm talking about then check this blog post in which I show several screenshots of this issue:
    http://blog.synthfan.info/2011/04/18/daw-expansio

    Pay esp. attention to the Operator screenshot at the upper right and compare it with the screenshot in the "test rack" in the middle.

    You may have guessed by now; all the soft synths I hold in high esteem (Operator, Absynth 5) also support alias protection yet can ALSO turn the whole kaboodle off. Resulting in a loss of wobble, which can be very important (IMO anyway) if you want to be sure of a clean sound signal. Anti-aliasing affects the sound waves, Diversion even does so quite heavily.

    Needless to say; Diversion can't turn this stuff off.

    Then there's the routing aspect. its not bad but doesn't even come close to the easily picked up scheme which Absynth 5 uses. By trying to cram the whole interface into one big (huge) window you're easily losing focus or overview here.

    What I also don't like is that there are certain filters which you simply cannot turn off what so ever. Oversampling, treble… I want a clear sound; I don't need treble, no matter how soft it is!

    Speaking of which.. The sound itself is decent but annoying too. What I esp. don't like is that with the oscs. octave set to 0 its still 1 octave /above/ all the other synths I have. Trying to use detune results in plain annoyance because I have to move my mouse upwards. But since the vst fills up most of my screen (I don't do high graphics on my synth box; I preserve as much resources for my synth as I can) there's not much room left to do so.

    And then I realized that this vst doesn't even support entering values manually using your keyboard. That is also when I removed the demo and decided to forget all about it and write this up.

    Now, I know this is a cynical review but don't get me wrong. In the overall Diversion isn't a bad vst. It does what it does and it can produce nice sounds. The main problem is that its absolutely /not/ worth $200. For that amount of money you can pick up Absynth 5 and when comparing features and sounds of those two I cannot conclude otherwise than that Absynth is miles ahead.

    And yes; I know its a "$50 bonus period". Still, my advice would be to save up another $50 and get Absynth 5 instead.

  12. I'm very under-impressed. For a going rate of $200 this critter is directly competing with NI's Absynth 5 which is also going at that price range. And honestly; you'll have to do a LOT better IMO to reach those heights.

    Now, before I continue do not take this the wrong way. I'm not dissing the product; when solely looking at the synth itself its pretty decent. 4 oscs, some basic routing capabilities (even a modulation matrix) lfo's, etc. The usual.

    My main gripe with this critter is that it claims to high for high quality yet cannot produce. For example; they claim a "near to zero level of aliasing". Now, that's fun you guys but you /do/ realize that all the anti-aliasing 'filtering' is having its effects on the waveforms your synths produce ? When I pull up my M4LScope in Live and check the default sawtooth waveform this critter produces I see some very heave wobbles at the bottom of the waveform; caused by anti-aliasing.

    If you now wonder wth I'm talking about then check this blog post in which I show several screenshots of this issue:
    http://blog.synthfan.info/2011/04/18/daw-expansio

    Pay esp. attention to the Operator screenshot at the upper right and compare it with the screenshot in the "test rack" in the middle.

    You may have guessed by now; all the soft synths I hold in high esteem (Operator, Absynth 5) also support alias protection yet can ALSO turn the whole kaboodle off. Resulting in a loss of wobble, which can be very important (IMO anyway) if you want to be sure of a clean sound signal. Anti-aliasing affects the sound waves, Diversion even does so quite heavily.

    Needless to say; Diversion can't turn this stuff off.

    Then there's the routing aspect. its not bad but doesn't even come close to the easily picked up scheme which Absynth 5 uses. By trying to cram the whole interface into one big (huge) window you're easily losing focus or overview here.

    What I also don't like is that there are certain filters which you simply cannot turn off what so ever. Oversampling, treble… I want a clear sound; I don't need treble, no matter how soft it is!

    Speaking of which.. The sound itself is decent but annoying too. What I esp. don't like is that with the oscs. octave set to 0 its still 1 octave /above/ all the other synths I have. Trying to use detune results in plain annoyance because I have to move my mouse upwards. But since the vst fills up most of my screen (I don't do high graphics on my synth box; I preserve as much resources for my synth as I can) there's not much room left to do so.

    And then I realized that this vst doesn't even support entering values manually using your keyboard. That is also when I removed the demo and decided to forget all about it and write this up.

    Now, I know this is a cynical review but don't get me wrong. In the overall Diversion isn't a bad vst. It does what it does and it can produce nice sounds. The main problem is that its absolutely /not/ worth $200. For that amount of money you can pick up Absynth 5 and when comparing features and sounds of those two I cannot conclude otherwise than that Absynth is miles ahead.

    And yes; I know its a "$50 bonus period". Still, my advice would be to save up another $50 and get Absynth 5 instead.

  13. I'm very under-impressed. For a going rate of $200 this critter is directly competing with NI's Absynth 5 which is also going at that price range. And honestly; you'll have to do a LOT better IMO to reach those heights.

    Now, before I continue do not take this the wrong way. I'm not dissing the product; when solely looking at the synth itself its pretty decent. 4 oscs, some basic routing capabilities (even a modulation matrix) lfo's, etc. The usual.

    My main gripe with this critter is that it claims to high for high quality yet cannot produce. For example; they claim a "near to zero level of aliasing". Now, that's fun you guys but you /do/ realize that all the anti-aliasing 'filtering' is having its effects on the waveforms your synths produce ? When I pull up my M4LScope in Live and check the default sawtooth waveform this critter produces I see some very heave wobbles at the bottom of the waveform; caused by anti-aliasing.

    If you now wonder wth I'm talking about then check this blog post in which I show several screenshots of this issue:
    http://blog.synthfan.info/2011/04/18/daw-expansio

    Pay esp. attention to the Operator screenshot at the upper right and compare it with the screenshot in the "test rack" in the middle.

    You may have guessed by now; all the soft synths I hold in high esteem (Operator, Absynth 5) also support alias protection yet can ALSO turn the whole kaboodle off. Resulting in a loss of wobble, which can be very important (IMO anyway) if you want to be sure of a clean sound signal. Anti-aliasing affects the sound waves, Diversion even does so quite heavily.

    Needless to say; Diversion can't turn this stuff off.

    Then there's the routing aspect. its not bad but doesn't even come close to the easily picked up scheme which Absynth 5 uses. By trying to cram the whole interface into one big (huge) window you're easily losing focus or overview here.

    What I also don't like is that there are certain filters which you simply cannot turn off what so ever. Oversampling, treble… I want a clear sound; I don't need treble, no matter how soft it is!

    Speaking of which.. The sound itself is decent but annoying too. What I esp. don't like is that with the oscs. octave set to 0 its still 1 octave /above/ all the other synths I have. Trying to use detune results in plain annoyance because I have to move my mouse upwards. But since the vst fills up most of my screen (I don't do high graphics on my synth box; I preserve as much resources for my synth as I can) there's not much room left to do so.

    And then I realized that this vst doesn't even support entering values manually using your keyboard. That is also when I removed the demo and decided to forget all about it and write this up.

    Now, I know this is a cynical review but don't get me wrong. In the overall Diversion isn't a bad vst. It does what it does and it can produce nice sounds. The main problem is that its absolutely /not/ worth $200. For that amount of money you can pick up Absynth 5 and when comparing features and sounds of those two I cannot conclude otherwise than that Absynth is miles ahead.

    And yes; I know its a "$50 bonus period". Still, my advice would be to save up another $50 and get Absynth 5 instead.

  14. I'm very under-impressed. For a going rate of $200 this critter is directly competing with NI's Absynth 5 which is also going at that price range. And honestly; you'll have to do a LOT better IMO to reach those heights.

    Now, before I continue do not take this the wrong way. I'm not dissing the product; when solely looking at the synth itself its pretty decent. 4 oscs, some basic routing capabilities (even a modulation matrix) lfo's, etc. The usual.

    My main gripe with this critter is that it claims to high for high quality yet cannot produce. For example; they claim a "near to zero level of aliasing". Now, that's fun you guys but you /do/ realize that all the anti-aliasing 'filtering' is having its effects on the waveforms your synths produce ? When I pull up my M4LScope in Live and check the default sawtooth waveform this critter produces I see some very heave wobbles at the bottom of the waveform; caused by anti-aliasing.

    If you now wonder wth I'm talking about then check this blog post in which I show several screenshots of this issue:
    http://blog.synthfan.info/2011/04/18/daw-expansio

    Pay esp. attention to the Operator screenshot at the upper right and compare it with the screenshot in the "test rack" in the middle.

    You may have guessed by now; all the soft synths I hold in high esteem (Operator, Absynth 5) also support alias protection yet can ALSO turn the whole kaboodle off. Resulting in a loss of wobble, which can be very important (IMO anyway) if you want to be sure of a clean sound signal. Anti-aliasing affects the sound waves, Diversion even does so quite heavily.

    Needless to say; Diversion can't turn this stuff off.

    Then there's the routing aspect. its not bad but doesn't even come close to the easily picked up scheme which Absynth 5 uses. By trying to cram the whole interface into one big (huge) window you're easily losing focus or overview here.

    What I also don't like is that there are certain filters which you simply cannot turn off what so ever. Oversampling, treble… I want a clear sound; I don't need treble, no matter how soft it is!

    Speaking of which.. The sound itself is decent but annoying too. What I esp. don't like is that with the oscs. octave set to 0 its still 1 octave /above/ all the other synths I have. Trying to use detune results in plain annoyance because I have to move my mouse upwards. But since the vst fills up most of my screen (I don't do high graphics on my synth box; I preserve as much resources for my synth as I can) there's not much room left to do so.

    And then I realized that this vst doesn't even support entering values manually using your keyboard. That is also when I removed the demo and decided to forget all about it and write this up.

    Now, I know this is a cynical review but don't get me wrong. In the overall Diversion isn't a bad vst. It does what it does and it can produce nice sounds. The main problem is that its absolutely /not/ worth $200. For that amount of money you can pick up Absynth 5 and when comparing features and sounds of those two I cannot conclude otherwise than that Absynth is miles ahead.

    And yes; I know its a "$50 bonus period". Still, my advice would be to save up another $50 and get Absynth 5 instead.

  15. I'm very under-impressed. For a going rate of $200 this critter is directly competing with NI's Absynth 5 which is also going at that price range. And honestly; you'll have to do a LOT better IMO to reach those heights.

    Now, before I continue do not take this the wrong way. I'm not dissing the product; when solely looking at the synth itself its pretty decent. 4 oscs, some basic routing capabilities (even a modulation matrix) lfo's, etc. The usual.

    My main gripe with this critter is that it claims to high for high quality yet cannot produce. For example; they claim a "near to zero level of aliasing". Now, that's fun you guys but you /do/ realize that all the anti-aliasing 'filtering' is having its effects on the waveforms your synths produce ? When I pull up my M4LScope in Live and check the default sawtooth waveform this critter produces I see some very heave wobbles at the bottom of the waveform; caused by anti-aliasing.

    If you now wonder wth I'm talking about then check this blog post in which I show several screenshots of this issue:
    http://blog.synthfan.info/2011/04/18/daw-expansio

    Pay esp. attention to the Operator screenshot at the upper right and compare it with the screenshot in the "test rack" in the middle.

    You may have guessed by now; all the soft synths I hold in high esteem (Operator, Absynth 5) also support alias protection yet can ALSO turn the whole kaboodle off. Resulting in a loss of wobble, which can be very important (IMO anyway) if you want to be sure of a clean sound signal. Anti-aliasing affects the sound waves, Diversion even does so quite heavily.

    Needless to say; Diversion can't turn this stuff off.

    Then there's the routing aspect. its not bad but doesn't even come close to the easily picked up scheme which Absynth 5 uses. By trying to cram the whole interface into one big (huge) window you're easily losing focus or overview here.

    What I also don't like is that there are certain filters which you simply cannot turn off what so ever. Oversampling, treble… I want a clear sound; I don't need treble, no matter how soft it is!

    Speaking of which.. The sound itself is decent but annoying too. What I esp. don't like is that with the oscs. octave set to 0 its still 1 octave /above/ all the other synths I have. Trying to use detune results in plain annoyance because I have to move my mouse upwards. But since the vst fills up most of my screen (I don't do high graphics on my synth box; I preserve as much resources for my synth as I can) there's not much room left to do so.

    And then I realized that this vst doesn't even support entering values manually using your keyboard. That is also when I removed the demo and decided to forget all about it and write this up.

    Now, I know this is a cynical review but don't get me wrong. In the overall Diversion isn't a bad vst. It does what it does and it can produce nice sounds. The main problem is that its absolutely /not/ worth $200. For that amount of money you can pick up Absynth 5 and when comparing features and sounds of those two I cannot conclude otherwise than that Absynth is miles ahead.

    And yes; I know its a "$50 bonus period". Still, my advice would be to save up another $50 and get Absynth 5 instead.

  16. I'm very under-impressed. For a going rate of $200 this critter is directly competing with NI's Absynth 5 which is also going at that price range. And honestly; you'll have to do a LOT better IMO to reach those heights.

    Now, before I continue do not take this the wrong way. I'm not dissing the product; when solely looking at the synth itself its pretty decent. 4 oscs, some basic routing capabilities (even a modulation matrix) lfo's, etc. The usual.

    My main gripe with this critter is that it claims to high for high quality yet cannot produce. For example; they claim a "near to zero level of aliasing". Now, that's fun you guys but you /do/ realize that all the anti-aliasing 'filtering' is having its effects on the waveforms your synths produce ? When I pull up my M4LScope in Live and check the default sawtooth waveform this critter produces I see some very heave wobbles at the bottom of the waveform; caused by anti-aliasing.

    If you now wonder wth I'm talking about then check this blog post in which I show several screenshots of this issue:
    http://blog.synthfan.info/2011/04/18/daw-expansio

    Pay esp. attention to the Operator screenshot at the upper right and compare it with the screenshot in the "test rack" in the middle.

    You may have guessed by now; all the soft synths I hold in high esteem (Operator, Absynth 5) also support alias protection yet can ALSO turn the whole kaboodle off. Resulting in a loss of wobble, which can be very important (IMO anyway) if you want to be sure of a clean sound signal. Anti-aliasing affects the sound waves, Diversion even does so quite heavily.

    Needless to say; Diversion can't turn this stuff off.

    Then there's the routing aspect. its not bad but doesn't even come close to the easily picked up scheme which Absynth 5 uses. By trying to cram the whole interface into one big (huge) window you're easily losing focus or overview here.

    What I also don't like is that there are certain filters which you simply cannot turn off what so ever. Oversampling, treble… I want a clear sound; I don't need treble, no matter how soft it is!

    Speaking of which.. The sound itself is decent but annoying too. What I esp. don't like is that with the oscs. octave set to 0 its still 1 octave /above/ all the other synths I have. Trying to use detune results in plain annoyance because I have to move my mouse upwards. But since the vst fills up most of my screen (I don't do high graphics on my synth box; I preserve as much resources for my synth as I can) there's not much room left to do so.

    And then I realized that this vst doesn't even support entering values manually using your keyboard. That is also when I removed the demo and decided to forget all about it and write this up.

    Now, I know this is a cynical review but don't get me wrong. In the overall Diversion isn't a bad vst. It does what it does and it can produce nice sounds. The main problem is that its absolutely /not/ worth $200. For that amount of money you can pick up Absynth 5 and when comparing features and sounds of those two I cannot conclude otherwise than that Absynth is miles ahead.

    And yes; I know its a "$50 bonus period". Still, my advice would be to save up another $50 and get Absynth 5 instead.

  17. I'm very under-impressed. For a going rate of $200 this critter is directly competing with NI's Absynth 5 which is also going at that price range. And honestly; you'll have to do a LOT better IMO to reach those heights.

    Now, before I continue do not take this the wrong way. I'm not dissing the product; when solely looking at the synth itself its pretty decent. 4 oscs, some basic routing capabilities (even a modulation matrix) lfo's, etc. The usual.

    My main gripe with this critter is that it claims to high for high quality yet cannot produce. For example; they claim a "near to zero level of aliasing". Now, that's fun you guys but you /do/ realize that all the anti-aliasing 'filtering' is having its effects on the waveforms your synths produce ? When I pull up my M4LScope in Live and check the default sawtooth waveform this critter produces I see some very heave wobbles at the bottom of the waveform; caused by anti-aliasing.

    If you now wonder wth I'm talking about then check this blog post in which I show several screenshots of this issue:
    http://blog.synthfan.info/2011/04/18/daw-expansio

    Pay esp. attention to the Operator screenshot at the upper right and compare it with the screenshot in the "test rack" in the middle.

    You may have guessed by now; all the soft synths I hold in high esteem (Operator, Absynth 5) also support alias protection yet can ALSO turn the whole kaboodle off. Resulting in a loss of wobble, which can be very important (IMO anyway) if you want to be sure of a clean sound signal. Anti-aliasing affects the sound waves, Diversion even does so quite heavily.

    Needless to say; Diversion can't turn this stuff off.

    Then there's the routing aspect. its not bad but doesn't even come close to the easily picked up scheme which Absynth 5 uses. By trying to cram the whole interface into one big (huge) window you're easily losing focus or overview here.

    What I also don't like is that there are certain filters which you simply cannot turn off what so ever. Oversampling, treble… I want a clear sound; I don't need treble, no matter how soft it is!

    Speaking of which.. The sound itself is decent but annoying too. What I esp. don't like is that with the oscs. octave set to 0 its still 1 octave /above/ all the other synths I have. Trying to use detune results in plain annoyance because I have to move my mouse upwards. But since the vst fills up most of my screen (I don't do high graphics on my synth box; I preserve as much resources for my synth as I can) there's not much room left to do so.

    And then I realized that this vst doesn't even support entering values manually using your keyboard. That is also when I removed the demo and decided to forget all about it and write this up.

    Now, I know this is a cynical review but don't get me wrong. In the overall Diversion isn't a bad vst. It does what it does and it can produce nice sounds. The main problem is that its absolutely /not/ worth $200. For that amount of money you can pick up Absynth 5 and when comparing features and sounds of those two I cannot conclude otherwise than that Absynth is miles ahead.

    And yes; I know its a "$50 bonus period". Still, my advice would be to save up another $50 and get Absynth 5 instead.

  18. I'm very under-impressed. For a going rate of $200 this critter is directly competing with NI's Absynth 5 which is also going at that price range. And honestly; you'll have to do a LOT better IMO to reach those heights.

    Now, before I continue do not take this the wrong way. I'm not dissing the product; when solely looking at the synth itself its pretty decent. 4 oscs, some basic routing capabilities (even a modulation matrix) lfo's, etc. The usual.

    My main gripe with this critter is that it claims to high for high quality yet cannot produce. For example; they claim a "near to zero level of aliasing". Now, that's fun you guys but you /do/ realize that all the anti-aliasing 'filtering' is having its effects on the waveforms your synths produce ? When I pull up my M4LScope in Live and check the default sawtooth waveform this critter produces I see some very heave wobbles at the bottom of the waveform; caused by anti-aliasing.

    If you now wonder wth I'm talking about then check this blog post in which I show several screenshots of this issue:
    http://blog.synthfan.info/2011/04/18/daw-expansio

    Pay esp. attention to the Operator screenshot at the upper right and compare it with the screenshot in the "test rack" in the middle.

    You may have guessed by now; all the soft synths I hold in high esteem (Operator, Absynth 5) also support alias protection yet can ALSO turn the whole kaboodle off. Resulting in a loss of wobble, which can be very important (IMO anyway) if you want to be sure of a clean sound signal. Anti-aliasing affects the sound waves, Diversion even does so quite heavily.

    Needless to say; Diversion can't turn this stuff off.

    Then there's the routing aspect. its not bad but doesn't even come close to the easily picked up scheme which Absynth 5 uses. By trying to cram the whole interface into one big (huge) window you're easily losing focus or overview here.

    What I also don't like is that there are certain filters which you simply cannot turn off what so ever. Oversampling, treble… I want a clear sound; I don't need treble, no matter how soft it is!

    Speaking of which.. The sound itself is decent but annoying too. What I esp. don't like is that with the oscs. octave set to 0 its still 1 octave /above/ all the other synths I have. Trying to use detune results in plain annoyance because I have to move my mouse upwards. But since the vst fills up most of my screen (I don't do high graphics on my synth box; I preserve as much resources for my synth as I can) there's not much room left to do so.

    And then I realized that this vst doesn't even support entering values manually using your keyboard. That is also when I removed the demo and decided to forget all about it and write this up.

    Now, I know this is a cynical review but don't get me wrong. In the overall Diversion isn't a bad vst. It does what it does and it can produce nice sounds. The main problem is that its absolutely /not/ worth $200. For that amount of money you can pick up Absynth 5 and when comparing features and sounds of those two I cannot conclude otherwise than that Absynth is miles ahead.

    And yes; I know its a "$50 bonus period". Still, my advice would be to save up another $50 and get Absynth 5 instead.

  19. Why on earth would you spend 200 notes on some duff software with a crap interface, when you could by for example a Novation K station , with a seriously good interference and real knobs and sliders. I think the audio criticism is well done. If soft synths are that expensive, then the only thing really soft is those buying them at that price!!!
    Hardware is ten times more reliable!! and it actually exists in the real world. How many people have lost there work and operating systems on these software synths!?

  20. stupid review SynthFan, it seems you haven’t tried to explore anything except the price. 19 post copies, you definitely have something personal against the plugin’s author, hi-hi.

  21. diversion is great…just released for mac…love it…can be very solid….and very experimental once you get used to turn the right knobs….triggered by the sounds you hear….great together with
    diva and zebra…

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