Facial Control For Music Revisited

Remember FaceOSC – the app that lets you use the facial ‘gestures’ to control music apps?

Peter Kirn shared another example of facial synth control yesterday, embedded above, which captures some experiments by FreeKa Tet.

If that doesn’t make you want to give up trying to look cool with a keytar and take up facial synth control, check out this video of Kostia Rapoport, experimenting with FaceOSC, TouchOSC & Ableton Live:

There’s actually quite a bit of experimentation going on with the idea of capturing facial movements and translating them into musical control signals.

Here’s a FaceOSC + Ableton Live jam, via Jonathan Hammond:

Damn, it feels good to be a gangsta, don’t it?

12 thoughts on “Facial Control For Music Revisited

  1. Peter kirn is awesome! His blog createdigitalmusic.com has some amazing indepth analysis on a lot of stuff I never really have the time to ever think about. Great guy to meet in person too btw! Glad to see more of his work getting out to the masses.

  2. i think he sucks. see if you can visualize the gestures i'm making with my face as i submit these words. thanks for deleting my last post…this site is starting to suck as well.

    1. Was that your comment, ‘peter’, about controlling synths with your anal sphincter?

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  3. Was that your comment, peter, about controlling synths with your anal sphincter?

    Comments that get reported multiple times are automatically taken offline. Let us know if you think your comment was removed in error.

  4. Was that your comment, peter, about controlling synths with your anal sphincter?

    Comments that get reported by readers multiple times are automatically taken offline. Let us know if you think your comment was removed in error.

  5. Well his comments are at least partly valid! The synth player that Prince used in his Musicology tour a few years back had a vibrating seat that communicated information regarding the dynamics of a piece of music thus making the synth player's use of expression a little more responsive. Take it a step further, and a 'sphincter synth' could provide a fabulously flatulent controlled experience over the now overly-hyped and flacid 'facial' controller.

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