Waldorf Iridium In-Depth Review

The latest loopop video is a very in-depth look at the new Waldorf Iridium synthesizer.

The Iridium is a 16-voice duo-timbral polyphonic synthesizer, offering twice the polyphony of the Quantum, but with digital filters, vs the Quantum’s analog filters.

Each of the Iridium’s voices features three oscillators, which can be any of five different oscillator types, dual stereo digital filters and a wide range of performance controls.

The Iridium also offers a wide range of connectivity options, including dual inputs and outputs, DIN MIDI, USB MIDI, USB Host support, a MicroSD slot & 8 cv/gate connections.

If you’ve used the Iridium, leave a comment and share your thoughts on it!

Topics covered:

0:00 Overview
7:50 User Interface
13:00 Osc controls
13:55 Wavetable
18:10 Waveform
21:15 Sampler
22:15 Multisamples
24:25 Granular
27:30 Live granular
28:40 Resonator
32:45 Kernels synth
38:00 Subharmonic kernels
39:05 Kernel macros
41:40 Stereo filters
45:15 Digi former
47:50 Effects
50:30 Modulation
53:10 Controllers
55:15 LFOs
56:10 Envelopes
57:15 Komplex mod
58:30 Layers & unison
1:00:20 Arpeggiator
1:01:40 Sequencer
1:04:13 Pad config
1:05:00 Pad trig sequencer
1:06:55 Misc
1:08:10 vs Quantum
1:09:00 Pros & cons

18 thoughts on “Waldorf Iridium In-Depth Review

  1. I have had synths since 82, does anyone remember EMU morpheus Z plane synthesis?
    This is a lot of money for a great looking panel. Surely it should be 4 part multi timbral.
    I am not impressed at this price range.

    1. Brandon, I’ve had several Proteus synths, but I wanted a Morpheus like mad because it was so otherworldly. The sound set was quirky & limited in places, but sweeping the EQ cube models with a pedal was unique. It would probably be a hit today, with better specs and an editor, but the closest you can get is Dave Rossum’s modular version. That one DOES let you modify the models, so its everything the first version only hinted at.

      I disagree on the price, which is not pocket change, but damn, look at the huge engine you get. That’s why its only bi-timbral, which is still a lot in an instrument this deep. Also keep the CV-connectivity in mind. Its designed to be a serious nerve center.

    1. Perhaps some counting might help?

      13:00 Osc controls
      13:55 Wavetable
      18:10 Waveform
      21:15 Sampler
      22:15 Multisamples
      24:25 Granular
      27:30 Live granular
      28:40 Resonator
      32:45 Kernels synth
      38:00 Subharmonic kernels

      Or
      Classic, Hypersaw, Wavetable, Wave PWM, Grain Simple, Grain Complex, Formant Simple and Formant complex

  2. Great Video by Loopop….covered a lot of my questions….congrats to Waldorf…I’ll be getting this system by the end of the year!!!

  3. It’s not cheap, but it’s certainly a powerful instrument. I suspect most who buy one will keep it in their studios for a long time (although it’s out of my price range).

  4. I buy music gear and cars the same way: for the long haul. I’ve bought lesser pieces like we all do, but I’ve always had one (or two) main instruments like the Iridium. You have to dig in to get your bucks’ worth, but lately, they’re making the prices easier to pro-rate creatively. I smell 10 years’ worth of good waiting to roll out of this one.

    1. People are selling used Blofeld desktop around $500 on Craigslist or eBay these days. Anyway, Blofeld still sounds great to me compared to the more complex Quantum/Iridium.

      1. hell, you can buy the Blofeld brand new for $519! it’s great and all, but not especially better than Largo. on that point, I’d gladly pay Waldorf prices for an Iridium VST. . .

    1. As always with this argument, you’re not factoring in all costs. To achieve the same functionality with an app, you’d have to buy a tablet, audio interface and midi controller, plus the time to research those. In total, it would still be a bit cheaper than this, but instead of a self-contained instrument with dedicated controls, you’d have a generic collection of devices, cables and adaptors. Long story short: Apples and oranges.

Leave a Reply