Casio Introduces New Casiotone Portable Keyboards

Casio today introduced three new Casiotone models – the CT-S1, CT-S400 and LK-S450.

  • The CT-S1 features 61 full-size keys with touch response, and is available in black, white or red. It features a stereo grand piano plus 60 other AiX-powered Tones.
  • The CT-S400 features 61 full-size keys with touch response and pitch bend wheel, with 600 AiX-powered Tones and 200 full accompaniment Rhythms.
  • The LK-S450 features 61 full-size keys with touch response and Key Lighting System, with 600 AiX-powered Tones and 200 full accompaniment Rhythms.

All three new Casiotone models have a range of connectivity options, including a class-compliant micro USB MIDI port. A USB host port is available for the separately sold Bluetooth adapter (WU-BT10) that provides wireless MIDI communication and can transform the keyboard into a wireless speaker.

Wired or wirelessly, users can link the keyboards to Casio’s dedicated Chordana Play, which will enable them to change the tempo or key of songs being played, in addition to displaying music scores and piano roll.

The new Casiotone models each have 61 keys, built-in speakers, multi-functional buttons and weigh only 9 lbs. The keyboards also have built-in strap locks to equip a guitar strap and convert the keyboard to a keytar.

Here is an intro to the CT-S1 from Casio’s Rich Formidoni:

CT-S1 Features:

  • 61 full-size keys with touch response
  • Available in black, white or red
  • Stereo grand piano plus 60 other AiX-powered Tones
  • Powerful bass-reflex stereo speaker system with surround effect
  • Easy one-button recorder
  • Strap pins for playing anywhere
  • Class-compliant USB-MIDI connects to free Chordana Play app
  • Optional WU-BT01 Bluetooth MIDI/Audio adapter
  • Optional 6xAA battery power (AC adapter and music rest included)

CT-S400 Features:

  • 61 full-size keys with touch response, pitch bend wheel and easy-to-use controls
  • 600 AiX-powered Tones and 200 full accompaniment Rhythms
  • Powerful bass-reflex stereo speaker system with surround effect
  • 5-track song recorder
  • Strap pins for playing anywhere
  • Class-compliant USB-MIDI connects to free Chordana Play app
  • Optional WU-BT01 Bluetooth MIDI/Audio adapter
  • Optional 6xAA battery power (AC adapter and music rest included)

LK-S450 Features:

  • 61 full-size keys with touch response and Key Lighting System
  • 600 AiX-powered Tones and 200 full accompaniment Rhythms
  • Powerful bass-reflex stereo speaker system with surround effect
  • 5-track song recorder
  • Strap pins for playing anywhere
  • Class-compliant USB-MIDI connects to free Chordana Play app
  • Optional WU-BT01 Bluetooth MIDI/Audio adapter
  • Optional 6xAA battery power (AC adapter and music rest included)

Pricing and Availability

The Casiotone CT-S1 will be available for pre-order on April 14, for $299 US (MSRP) / $199 US MAP. The keyboard is expected to ship / be available in stores in late May 2021. The CT-S400 (MSRP: $349.99) and LK-S450 (MSRP: $399.99) will be available for pre order April 14, 2021. For more information visit the Casio website.

19 thoughts on “Casio Introduces New Casiotone Portable Keyboards

  1. I wish I had access to sounds like this when I was 15 (1988). I was playing in bands but couldn’t get anything close to a decent piano or even an electronic piano. Eventually got a Roland D20 and STILL didn’t have what I needed. (Loved the sequencer, though.) These seem priced right and might be a great way to go for a young person with limited funds. I just hope the feel is adequate. I love the idea that cheap keyboards don’t need to sound cheap anymore. I also love the idea of a fairly inexpensive instrument that can be given as a gift.

  2. honestly, that looks really nice and handy, fun and playable, but good lord please explain what “touch response” *actually* means. These gimmicky terms related to keyboard action and “playability” are so confusing and not specific. in the video it just looks and sounds like… velocity? That’s not not even worth mentioning in 2021 unless you specifically do *not* have it. did I miss a key detail here? website suggests “sensitivity levels” which i assume means it only reads three velocity values?

    also, just want to say that in this case, the seemingly cheapest option is the most appealing to me for its simplicity. the “fancier” ones have really dorky looking screens i’d rather skip. in any case, seems to sound good and be nifty enough to consider for fun.

    1. Heh, I wondered that, too. Let me ask Rich.

      I’m sure it does mean velocity and some marketing person said they wanted a less technical term. But which keybed they’re using is a question – Casio has in the past done wonders with some pretty low-cost stuff that feels solid to play, thanks to their volume.

    2. Yes, “touch response” is Casio’s long-standing term for velocity sensitivity. The three sensitivity levels refer to different velocity curve choices for different playing styles (light, normal and heavy).

    3. `Yea, for these entry level consumer/kid-friendly keyboards, “touch sensitivity” has been the term for years. Also, in this type of product, it is pretty common for keyboards to not have it. And trust me, they will not say “Lacks Touch Sensitivity” in their marketing material. So people wanting keys like this, they have to make sure they see that.

  3. the 400 seems really useful – I am actually kind of interested since it would be an easy slap on controller and I think my 6 year old could have fun on it too

  4. The only problem with the new Casios is they don’t use filters; they use velocity switching. When you strike a key softly, then loudly, you won’t hear a dynamic filter sound brighter like the Yamaha PSR series. You will hear different samples pre-recorded with brightness. Early programmers say the filter is the heart of the synthesizer, but that’s all changed now.

    1. Actually, lots of tones in all three new CT-S models do indeed use dynamic, velocity-based filters. It’s especially noticeable with synth tones. The arpeggiator in the CT-S400 can also automate filter sweeps.

      1. Is this Rich Formidoni? With all due respect, I owned a CT-S300, and the filter sounds were not dynamic; they were velocity-switched samples. Listen closely. I still own my XW-G1 (which also lacks polyphonic filters), so I’m not slagging Casio!

  5. Class-compliant USB-MIDI is nice to see, and not to be taken for granted. Often drivers are required from some other major manufacturers.

    1. I don’t know. I might like an “angst ash” or “drab diarrhea” or “yellowish clear” or “sauce speckles” or “bile blue” or “urban dirt” or “grieving grey” or “opaque eyelid”

      Those colours match my lifestyle.

  6. Think we did not get a full-fledged synthesizer from Casio in awhile now. Mass market modern Casio keybeds do not last as well as Yamahas’. I observed that many such mid to low priced Casio keyboards suffer the sunken key syndrome. The vintage ones were fine though.

  7. “The keyboards also have built-in strap locks to equip a guitar strap and convert the keyboard to a keytar.”

    Way to bury the lede!
    Headline should be “Casio releases new 61-key keytars with built-in speakers and battery power that can also be played while seated.”

  8. So a question – I didn’t see an audio out mentioned other than a headphone jack on the CTS-1. Did I get that right or did I miss something?

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