Auria 48-Track Recorder App For The iPad Submitted To Apple For Review

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Wavemachine Labs has announced that it has submitted Auria, a new 48-track recorder for the iPad, to Apple for approval.

Here’s the official summary for Auria:

With the ability to play 48 mono or stereo 24bit/44.1 kHz (higher sample rates possible!) tracks simultaneously, record up to 24 of those tracks simultaneously (through any supported USB multichannel audio interface), and edit and mix with familiar tools and full parameter automation, it’s clear Auria sets a new standard for iPad multitracking.

What’s more, Auria’s 64-bit Double Precision architecture ensures ample headroom for plug-in processing and mix summing, transforming your iPad into a recording and mixing system with sound quality that rivals most DAWs.

The depth is in the details. Like customizable pan laws. Like meters that are selectable between peak and RMS. Like full delay compensation for all tracks, including aux sends and sub-groups. Complete with a vintage-inspired channel strip on every channel, a dedicated master channel strip, VST effects engineered by renowned makers such as PSPaudioware, Overloud, Fab Filter and Drumagog, and support for Dropbox, Soundcloud, AAF, and MP3, Auria truly raises the bar for recording and mixing on the iPad.

The introductory price for Auria will be $49.99.

Here’s a sneak preview of Auria, from earlier in the year:

We’ll let you know when this hits the App Store.

31 thoughts on “Auria 48-Track Recorder App For The iPad Submitted To Apple For Review

    1. Audiobus runs risk of not getting approved due to grey areas, see their site q+a page, don’t count on it. We want it to happen but no point being certain

      1. So was Cantor, and it was approved. Apple has been very transparent when it comes to legitimate apps and TOS conflicts. Even if audiobus had to pare down its functions, shareable audio alone will be awesome. I’d say the chances a slightly better than not it goes through.

  1. Introductory price of 49.99? Damn. Will have to see if it’s worth it for this price. Still, this definitely won’t be an impulse buy.

  2. The A5X processor is 32 bit. They’ve got a 64 bit double precision engine? Why on earth would you need 64 bit math? The A/D input goes up to 24 bits resolution. Adding 48 tracks together, you should still be comfortably in the 32-bit zone.

    Methinks there was a marketing person involved in the press release….

    Not to say that I’m not looking forward to this — it’s ambitious, and it might be as cool as I hope it will be.

    1. plenty of 64bit precision mixer on DAWs are having fun on 32bit machines right now. It is not a typo from their marketing department.

    2. Totally depends how they do their maths but roughly speaking, doubling volume requires an extra bit. So with 48 tracks you could conceivably need an extra 48 bits. 64 bit is pretty common in summing engines. More bits just means more headroom (in a mathematical sense)

      1. Doubling volume requires 1 bit (2 tracks). The second bit gets you 4x, and the third gets you 8x. With 6 bits, you get 64 tracks added together without loss of precision. With 24 bit samples, that’s 30 bits total, still in range of an ordinary float. Higher precision math takes more time, memory, and power — none of these are resources that should be wasted on the iPad, and they’re obviously trying to push things to the limit. For desktop hardware, I can see going 64-bit (although I’m sure I couldn’t hear the difference). On the limited hardware of the iPad — I just don’t get it.

  3. with all the respect and no flags. but who is switching from pro tools, logic, etc to this app?
    the desktop computing thing will not work on the tablet world.
    yes, you will sound cool recording in your expensive tablet, but, really, it is not a professional tool.
    devs should keep tablets as they are, tablets, not pro computers with years ahead of bugfixes, knowledge, users base etc.
    there is a lot of things that can inovate on the audio domain when you use such tablet. why devs cant stick with this? it has no power to hold a serious *professional* daw, just one more sketchpad

    1. So, if someone wants to play you a piece of music to cheer you up when you’re sad, you are first concerned about what that someone uses to bring you that song?

  4. I’m sceptical of the term “professional tool”. What defines a professional is how they apply the tools available to them. A great mix engineer will get more out of a 12 channel mackie than an amateur will get out of an ssl or neve

    I also doubt that they’re expecting anyone to “switch” – I use a desktop for almost all my work but I noodle as a part time composer and I travel a lot. The idea of being able to tinker with a few synths, export it all to Auria, start a mix and then export the lot via aaf to tools is extremely interesting to me. I can kind of do it now -mutitrack daw by harmonic dog is simple and slick but lacks processing. Meteor has everything on board but using it is like torture.

    If they get the in app purchase prices in a sweet spot, introduce some soft synths, and play nice with audiobus, this will be awesome.

    Its also worth adding that ten years ago, no serious producer would have used a laptop as a “main” machine, now i know half a dozen grammy winners who do exactly that. I remember spending four grand (pounds) on a PowerBook g4 and Protools le for when i travelled and that was less powerful than Auria. Add to that the fact that touch is the natural interface for recording and mixing, and I think this could all be very interesting indeed

  5. I’m sceptical of the term “professional tool”. What defines a professional is how they apply the tools available to them. A great mix engineer will get more out of a 12 channel mackie than an amateur will get out of an ssl or neve

    I also doubt that they’re expecting anyone to “switch” – I use a desktop for almost all my work but I noodle as a part time composer and I travel a lot. The idea of being able to tinker with a few synths, export it all to Auria, start a mix and then export the lot via aaf to tools is extremely interesting to me. I can kind of do it now -mutitrack daw by harmonic dog is simple, fast and slick but lacks processing. Meteor has everything on board but using it is like torture.

    If they get the in app purchase prices in a sweet spot, introduce some soft synths, and play nice with audiobus, this will be awesome.

    Its also worth adding that ten years ago, no serious producer would have used a laptop as a “main” machine, now i know half a dozen grammy winners who do exactly that. I remember spending four grand (pounds) on a PowerBook g4 and Protools le for when i travelled and that was less powerful than Auria. Add to that the fact that touch is the natural interface for recording and mixing, and I think this could all be very interesting indeed

  6. i agree with you, yes i have put some pro here and there, but, i think, still what i said, sketchpad, nice tool for travelling, etc. just few thoughts from myself. nothing against the dev or leading the unhappy boy here.
    also im not sure about mixing with this app since i see a lot of apps that are hard to tweak tiny parameters via touchscreen.

  7. Well I already use multitrack with its limited interface to track out my a jam on my MPC500 on the go so this should be able to do an even better job. I’ll most def check it out. Been waiting for this and the new MPC 2000 app.

  8. I’m excited about this to see if they can deliver on their promise, hopefully ipad 1 support is still included before ios 6 leaves it in the dust. For me this will be very useful for when I’m away from my main rig, could pop round to see my friends and record vocals, instruments etc and try out a few ideas. Also could be useful when traveling and collecting sounds, do some edits in the field or at the hotel, save a backup to drop box and carry on working on my main rig when I get home.

    Multi-touch kinds of brings it back full circle to a certain degree, altho it can’t fully replace knobs and sliders I still find it more intuitive than a mouse and keyboard. Hopefully it will have midi clock sync so it can act as an expander for logic, if I’m away from home with my laptop and ipad, can see a few possibilities for this, but on the downside, ipad 3 is even more tempting now so it can handle those channel strips and plug-in without keeling over, my wallet has suffered great strain this year already.

  9. I am excited by this, but sceptical … to be used as a serious pro DAW it needs a quality multi-IO audio interface and a big hard disk … not exactly a “portable” setup, at least not much different than a laptop based one.

  10. I use GarageBand on my iPad. Not because it’s the best DAW or the best music app. I use GarageBand because I can start a track on the couch, at the bar, at a friends house while we watch Family Guy (I use headphones, I’m not rude), or any place that isn’t my studio, and then export the file and use it in Logic on my Mac. That is the key feature. if this (or any DAW) does the job better and exports to Logic (or GarageBand if need be), then I’ll consider switching. I love that I can have what we used to call a “demo” on my iPad and take it into Logic on my Mac without having to start from scratch.

    1. There you go: portability from the iPad to a Mac makes it a lot more tempting to me. I love Logic, but my hangup resides in the size of the landscape. Too much miniaturization has made for cramped work experiences. I have no issues with touchscreens as such. Its making them so small that even as crisp as they have become, I still have to stick my nose on it to see all of the details. My vision is good and that aspect still feels “off” to me. I like the THROW of a good slider and I want a similar behavior from a touchscreen. I’ll go for it when they make a 17″ pad I can massage more readily, but it’ll be a while before I’ll give up my old QWERTY keyboard. As with real keyboards for synths, I’m not quite satisfied with the alternatives so far. This looks like a great app, but when Logic entire is $200, its a bit of a reach to use this as your main work surface. Its only IMO, of course, as I just heard a great piece done entirely in Reaper. Serious iPad music apps are impressing me a lot in the early stages; they’re taking less tuning-up time than softsynths did when they first appeared.

  11. Just curious: how does recording 24 tracks at once work? What multichannel audio interfaces work with the iPad? I’ve only owned an iPad for a month or so and I was under the impression that they only devices it supports are like iRig, etc.

  12. I’d like to see them release a smaller, less expensive version of this with the same plug in capabilities. I personally would really only every need 4 – 8 tracks. The AAF import/export could be the killer feature of this app, if it works well. I also hope the standard feature set includes all the tools you would need to do some functional recording/mixing. If they nickel and dime users to buy every little thing, like a compressor, EQ, etc, then it’s going to skew the cost/benefit curve very rapidly.

  13. thats not the point. just a suggestion about bringing more innovation in the app world. i know, there is a lot, but i think devs could put it in another level.
    really i have a fear to see the same of the gaming market with our audio apps. lots of concepts from the desktop (console) computing that just doesnt work with ipad

  14. ok reply above was to pongfu, sorry im the opera mini on my phone, i think opera mini do not handle the reply system

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